unquotable


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unquotable

(ʌnˈkwəʊtəbəl)
adj
not able or suitable to be quoted or repeated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unquotable - not able or fit to be repeated or quotedunquotable - not able or fit to be repeated or quoted; "what he said was funny but unquotable"
quotable, repeatable - able or fit to be repeated or quoted; "what he said was not repeatable in polite company"; "he comes up with so many quotable phrases"
References in classic literature ?
A native proverb - unquotable - showed the blackness of Kim's disapproval.
For Levinas, on the contrary, the infinite reaches of the Other, the Other's interiority insofar as it cannot ever come to light exhaustively, remains therefore, in Benjamin's terms, unquotable in its entirety by history (such an interiority has no "entirety," being an infinite potentiality).
One of the quotes attributed to the usually unquotable First Lady Bess Truman was her answer to what she thought the most important task of a First Lady should be.
I always thought it a bit odd that a biographer of Whitman, who is so unquotable, would go on to edit Bartlett's.
And, finally, Gary Saul Morson encourages us to read the most homely vehicle of verbal cliche, the quotable phrase, as offering flashes of connection and insight in the hands of Tolstoy, who deploys the quotable in unquotable ways to defamiliarizing effect.
Nothing beyond a series of unquotable sources and some idle speculation.
And of course, take holders and competition favourites Whitley Bay, whose Chris Moore - shy to the point of being unquotable - means to let his feet rather than his terrible puns do the talking.
From listening to unquotable sources, they say no, that we're probably going to race here for another four years," he said after saddling Obrigado in the closing-day $142,500 Sunset Handicap.
In isolation, their trading in ethnic and faith stereotypes renders most of them unquotable.
Muldoon mimics American slang and mixes it with literary allusions in a hash of colorful, unquotable pastiche, full of verbal echoes, a series of non sequiturs without beginning, middle, or end.
In 1975, Raymond Bellour wrote that cinema constituted "an unattainable text," a text that unlike the written word was fleeting and ephemeral because it was unquotable.