unreckoned

unreckoned

(ʌnˈrɛkənd)
adj
1. not reckoned, noted, identified, or enumerated
2. not dealt with or addressed
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Lois's silence may have contributed to her fiances death, and a featureless futurelessness returns with a vengeance as an "extra day, unreckoned .
43) The wild fig tree is like nature unaccounted for, unreckoned, leftover from the time Zeus took over after his defeat of Typhon (Said 1977), a time marked by chaos yielding to organization and mutual, beneficial interdependence.
Komunyakaa understands how unreckoned interiors supply deadly energy to the masquerade of imprisoned and imprisoning selves.
grant us the sky, unreckoned towers: the second elevation" (61).
In Part One, "1989 (The Unconfined Unreckoned Year)," Clover structures his first three chapters around the genres of hip hop, acid house, and grunge, linking them with "bridges" that pivot between chapters and culminate in a fourth chapter focusing on the "metagenre" of pop.
The second Part argues that there are unreckoned moral and
The most prominent politics are sexual: in the character of Lavinia in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, in Abraham Fraunce's interpretations of Ovidian myths for a female patron in The Countess of Pembroke's Ivychurch (1592), and in the previously unreckoned Ovidian endeavors of four women (Bess of Hardwick in the sixteenth century, Mary Lady Chudleigh with Rowe and Montagu toward the end of the book's timeline).
Compared to the first elevator, invented by Elisha Otis in the early nineteenth century, which "delivered [people] from medieval five- and six-story constructions," this (post)modern invention, developed by James Fulton, "will grant [people] the sky, unreckoned towers: the second elevation.
The fisherman waits, a watchman who will see the dawn, a guard who stands at the border on a night that is never really dark, these comings, these goings not unreckoned by him.
15) We can divine in Wyatt's love poetry personality traits that could play an unreckoned role in its habitual unsatisfaction.
As Conrad said, we should 'in the destructive element immerse' but only for the unreckoned outcomes of life, vigour and challenge.
Yet these millions of innocents remain unreckoned with--and publicly unmemorialized--in the very societies that caused them so much suffering and death.