unroyal

unroyal

(ʌnˈrɔɪəl)
adj
1. inappropriate for royalty
2. not of royal blood
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
His was a most unroyal career, but the most pitiable spectacle in it was his sentimental treachery to his Swiss guard on that memorable 10th of August, when he allowed those heroes to be massacred in his cause, and forbade them to shed the "sacred French blood" purporting to be flowing in the veins of the red-capped mob of miscreants that was raging around the palace.
Their indulgent parents subsidized all of their extravagant and even wasteful lifestyles to the enabler max, so all the unroyal princes and princesses had to worry about was how to fill their days and nights with exciting and expensive things to do-and be seen doing them!
Putin has accused the prince of unacceptable and unroyal behavior for remarks that a British newspaper reported he made to a Jewish woman who fled Poland during the war.
And true to form, Zara Phillips' wedding was refreshingly unroyal.
For the Grime Royal Wedding service, the producers plan to take turns running the ceremony, and hope music fans will turn their backs on street parties and join them for a right unroyal knees-up.
In fact, most racetracks are decidedly unroyal places with grandstands frequented by addicted gamblers and seedy hustlers passing out useless tip sheets.
A SOLDIER proudly takes Camilla for a spin in a Bulldog armoured carrier yesterday - blissfully unaware of the very unroyal message on its side.
Peele's play, which probably preceded Marlowe's since the latter seems to have borrowed verbally from it, (2) is episodic, textually garbled as the result of imperfect revision, and inconsistent in its characterization of Queen Elinor: sometimes she appears as a comedic figure, speaking in a tone of unroyal jocosity as King Edward's "sweete Nell" (line 74) (3)--as his earthy, plain-spoken but adored companion in military campaigns (including a crusade) and even as a vulgar boxer of her husband's ear; at other points she emblematizes hateful Spanish pride, being portrayed as a witch-like foreign princess (Elinor of Castile) who would have the beards of all her male subjects shaved off and the breasts of all women mutilated, and who is given to haughty, egregiously inflated rhetoric.
As someone who has himself lived in the media scrutiny and who knows what it is to be criticised for all too human failings, I felt his well-meaning remarks on a Princess criticised for her unroyal but normal faults of smoking, drinking and enjoying the company of men were understanding and compassionate.
When she finds her to be a distinctly unroyal, ungroomed and headstrong San Franciscan teenager she is obliged toperform a My Fair Lady-liketransformation.
I would also point out that Henry applies renaming techniques to himself, not only throughout the Henriad, but also in this play; when he borrows Erpingham's cloak to roam around the campsite, King Henry V reverts to calling himself the very unroyal 'Harry'.
Encountering one obstacle after another, our heroes (for they are clearly meant by the logic of storytelling to be our heroes)(2) overcome these challenges by making the most of the distinctly unroyal conduct of quibbling, distracting the opposition, and sometimes just running away.