unseaworthiness

unseaworthiness

(ʌnˈsiːwɜːðɪnəs)
n
(Nautical Terms) (of a boat, ship, etc) the condition of being not fit to travel at sea
Translations

unseaworthiness

nSeeuntüchtigkeit f
References in periodicals archive ?
complaint based on unseaworthiness included a demand for punitive
So many colliers died that they became known as coffin ships, however others were victims of storms, collisions, combustion, enemy action, pirates, and worst of all, just total unseaworthiness.
The public-policy violation, according to the court, arose not from the arbitrator's failure to apply United States law, but rather because applying Philippine law effectively denied Asignacion the opportunity to pursue the remedies to which he was entitled as a seaman, such as maintenance and cure, negligence and unseaworthiness.
We will not further comment on the vessel's unseaworthiness as this is not the object of the present study (supra note 5).
203) This statutory patchwork thus fails to provide any death action sounding in unseaworthiness for a seaman whose death occurs within a state's territorial waters.
33) Maintenance, cure and unseaworthiness are derived from general maritime law.
116) The vessel owner then impleaded the longshoreman's employer, "alleging the unseaworthiness of the vessel, if any, was due to the employer's negligence.
The courts have cited the unseaworthiness of vessels, (96) the lack of life jackets, the scarcity of food and the consequent danger to passengers as aggravating factors.
In sentencing crew members of the Bride, the Footscray Bench acknowledged the men had twice tried to lodge a complaint of unseaworthiness prior to striking.
There are many claims that can be filed under the Jones Act, such as maintenance and cure, pain and suffering, unseaworthiness and others.
The carrier shall not be responsible for loss or damage arising or resulting from unseaworthiness of the ship concerned, if that state is not due to a lack of reasonable care on the part of the transporter to make the ship seaworthy, to properly man, equip and supply the ship, to make the holds, refrigerating and cool chambers, and all other parts of the ship in which goods are carried, fit and safe for their reception, carriage and preservation.