unseaworthiness

unseaworthiness

(ʌnˈsiːwɜːðɪnəs)
n
(Nautical Terms) (of a boat, ship, etc) the condition of being not fit to travel at sea
Translations

unseaworthiness

nSeeuntüchtigkeit f
References in periodicals archive ?
So many colliers died that they became known as coffin ships, however others were victims of storms, collisions, combustion, enemy action, pirates, and worst of all, just total unseaworthiness.
203) This statutory patchwork thus fails to provide any death action sounding in unseaworthiness for a seaman whose death occurs within a state's territorial waters.
33) Maintenance, cure and unseaworthiness are derived from general maritime law.
Moran's inadequate training and safety procedures not only contributed to the unseaworthiness of the tug and its crew, but also constituted negligence," according to the court's opinion.
116) The vessel owner then impleaded the longshoreman's employer, "alleging the unseaworthiness of the vessel, if any, was due to the employer's negligence.
In sentencing crew members of the Bride, the Footscray Bench acknowledged the men had twice tried to lodge a complaint of unseaworthiness prior to striking.
There are many claims that can be filed under the Jones Act, such as maintenance and cure, pain and suffering, unseaworthiness and others.
under the Jones Act and for unseaworthiness under general maritime law.
Although the FELA is the railway worker's sole claim against the employer for injuries, the seaman can also recover against the employer and the vessel for unseaworthiness, maintenance, and cure.
31004) and the general maritime law (the judicially created remedies of maintenance and cure, unseaworthiness and wrongful death available to seamen).
For various reasons (not least the unseaworthiness of the Speedwell) it was not until mid-September that the Mayflower sailed, by now crowded with 102 passengers (66 men, 26 women and 10 children).