unsecular

unsecular

(ʌnˈsɛkjʊlə)
adj
not secular
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuhaus, Unsecular America, Appendix, Table 3; and.
1) See: Mark Silk, Unsecular Media: Making News of Religion in America (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1995); Jay Newman, Religion vs.
Suspicious and uncomfortable about "inaccessible" or not readily accessible dimensions of life, it forgets that art is unsecular, as is history (because it contains many depths and perspectives).
As I have noted several times, secular India has a very unsecular and unsavory record on protecting minority groups.
Throughout the 1960s and '70s, Greeley produced a torrent of influential sociological works, including 1972's Unsecular Man: The Persistence of Religion and 1977's The American Catholic: A Social Portrait.
I think this is a genuine opportunity for Turkey to come to terms with its unsecular, oppressive policies of laicism and, having resolved at least on the basis of societal goodwill the headscarf issue now, Turkey is on the right track to democratize itself further.
Strom Thurmond (R-SC) and Jesse Helms (R-NC), who put into the record their very dearly unsecular purpose to help evangelical groups mobilize prayer.
The Church-State Dilemma of American Jews" in Jews in Unsecular America, ed.
Although the shape of these reconfigurations differs from country to country in the Middle East, the current transnational migration of histories and signifiers has largely carried this twentieth-century memory from such countries as Iran and Turkey into the contemporary signification of the veil as unsecular and unmodern.
Nowhere else has secular legislation produced such an unsecular and almost scriptural understanding of what it takes to heal a nation.
Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College in Hartford and author of Unsecular Media: Making News of Religion in America.