unshriven

unshriven

(ʌnˈʃrɪvn)
adj
not shriven
References in classic literature ?
they suffer to die like the houseless dog on yonder common, unshriven and tinhouseled
However, for my part, I would rather die unshriven than have anything to say to such a confessor.
May I die unshriven," he cried vehemently, "if all that I am about to tell you is not true.
Probably Melenchon, because he could persuade more people to hold their noses and vote for an ex-Trotskyist than Le Pen could convince to vote for the unshriven daughter of a fascist.
Out of my mouth shot a few words, words that, a whole year later, I turned into the unshriven heart of a poem.
After an unpleasant interlude of skidding on black ice and stumbling into potholes, I ran across three friendly white folks, CUA students who'd foundered on some unshriven streetcorner.
For example, Jean de Courtaulin delighted in the unshriven death of a senior Jesuit who had come to Cochinchina hoping to oust the French.
Peasants worried that dying unshriven might lead to eternal torment; so did the Church.
I've never visited a psychiatrist and plan on dying unshriven by that priesthood, but do recognize some of my selfishness, obtuseness, and "fear and trembling" nevertheless.
10) Anima's reference to being 'in this vale' (3010) may refer to purgatory, though Humanum Genus's bed is in the castle of salvation, the stage plan contains no scaffold for purgatory, Anima does not seem to undergo any of the suffering that was traditionally associated with purgatory (especially for an unshriven soul), and Malus Angelus eventually drags Anima to Belial's scaffold, that is, to hell.
And he comes from the War to tell his tale like Hamlet's ghost from the fires of purgatory, unshriven and unforgiving, with greater wrongs and with less excuse.