unsuccess


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un·suc·cess

 (ŭn′sək-sĕs′)
n.
Failure to achieve a desired end.

unsuccess

(ˌʌnsəkˈsɛs)
n
failure, lack of success, or an instance thereof
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unsuccess

noun
The condition of not achieving the desired end:
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References in periodicals archive ?
The problem results in the unsuccess of the CI-URI to establish a more permanent teaching force to meet the increasing need of teaching Chinese in local areas.
In this sense, Babbitt points out relevantly that Friedrich Schlegel, on speaking about the unsuccess of his play Alarcos, complained as follows:
Follow, poet, follow right To the bottom of the night, With your unconstraining voice Still persuade us to rejoice With the farming of a verse Make a vineyard of the curse Sing of human unsuccess In a rapture of distress In the desert of the heart Let the healing fountain start In the prison of his days Teach the free man how to praise.
But the force said it would be too expensive under Freedom of Information laws to check how many of those applications have been successful or unsuccess ful.
I thought, All labour, yet no less Bear up beneath their unsuccess.
Success in innovation; improving the odds by understanding the factors for unsuccess.
1991: Soviet hardliners toppled President Gorbachev in a dramatic but ultimately unsuccess.
His passions and longings are typical of a person who is after something ideal that he craves for but the conscious-self dissuades him from pursuing this course because of the fear of unsuccess.
A second reason for the apparent unsuccess of (33) is the divergence of the summation [summation over n] [u.
Angels of unsuccess, we floated over molten pavement that poured downtown to shimmering towers where we did the small things we did then, for money.
John Dennis of San Francisco, an ergonomic furniture entrepreneur who campaigned for Paul and was endorsed by him, ran unsuccess fully against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in 2010 on the Republican ticket, and is trying again this year.
Whether it was Pound's images or Yeats's symbols or Eliot's allusions, they were all devices intended to serve one purpose and one purpose only, and that was to conceal personal pain and hopes and fears and feelings, beliefs, opinions, and dislikes, so that they, as poets, might not appear to be merely continuing to lament human unsuccess as all of the preceding generations of poets have only ever done.