untimeliness


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Related to untimeliness: scrutinisation

un·time·ly

 (ŭn-tīm′lē)
adj. un·time·li·er, un·time·li·est
1. Occurring or done at an inappropriate time; inopportune.
2. Occurring too soon; premature: an untimely death.
adv.
1. Inopportunely.
2. Prematurely.

un·time′li·ness n.

Timeliness/Untimeliness

 

See Also: STALENESS

  1. As modern as tomorrow —Slogan, Royal Worcester Corset Co.
  2. As out of date as the black stockings and high shoes worn by inmates of asylums that used to take up city blocks and loom large in the countryside —Eileen Simpson, New York Times/Op-Ed, May 1, 1987
  3. As seasonable as snow in summer —John Ray’s Proverbs
  4. By the time they take place [dinner parties] the original impulse is lost … like sending a Christmas card into space and hoping an alien finds it on the right date —Maxine Chernoff
  5. Dated as a dodo, but who cares —Anon capsule review, television movie listings, New York Times, April, 1987
  6. Dead as a failed product launch —Anon

    For other “Dead as” similes which apply to obsolescence,

    See Also: DEATH

  7. Dead as an unsuccessful book —Henry James
  8. Dead as Greek —Karl Shapiro
  9. Dead as Sunday’s paper on Tuesday morning —Anon

    Commonly used variations are “Dead as yesterday’s front page news” and “Dead as last week’s ticker tape.”

  10. Extinction, like a thing of beauty, is forever —Brad Leithauser, New York Times Book Review, June 7, 1987

    Another simile that was extracted from an article and featured as an attention-getting blurb.

  11. Gone like the carriage-horse —Louis MacNeice

    Poet MacNeice precedes the simile with this question: “What’s become of the squadron of butlers, valets, grooms and second housemaids?” Clearly, appropriate substitutions for the carriage-horse could give rise to as many similes beginning with “Gone like” as there are obsolete customs and objects. “Gone … like five-cent candy and the drainboard on the sink” from a novel by Babs H. Deal offers just one possibility.

  12. Good that comes too late is as good as nothing —Thomas Fuller
  13. It’s a little like being given the captaincy of the Titanic after it hit the ice floe —Senator Lawton Chiles of Florida, quoted in many newspapers on prospect of heading Senate budget committee, after November, 1986, Democratic victory

    See Also: FUTILITY

  14. Like a punchline of a bad joke, the moment passed —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  15. (Conflicts as) new as each generation —Anon, jacket copy

    Because similes are so often pulled out from book jacket copy, the more one can appropriately include, the better; and so, this and the “Old as literature” comparison below were both featured on one book jacket.

  16. New as tomorrow —Slogan, dictaphone company
  17. (Passions and conflicts as) old as literature —Anon book jacket copy
  18. No day is so dead as the day before yesterday —W. Somerset Maugham
  19. Obsolete as books in leather bindings —Louis MacNeice
  20. Outdated like a last year’s almanac —John Greenleaf Whittier
  21. Timing … as elegant as that of the Budapest String Quartet —Karl Shapiro
  22. (The reference library is quite) unfrequented … like the mausoleum of a once-proud family that has died out —Robert Barnard
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Untimeliness - being at an inappropriate timeuntimeliness - being at an inappropriate time  
timing - the time when something happens
seasonableness, timeliness - being at the right time
2.Untimeliness - the quality of occurring at an inconvenient timeuntimeliness - the quality of occurring at an inconvenient time
inconvenience - the quality of not being useful or convenient
Translations

untimeliness

n (of death)Vorzeitigkeit f; (of end also)Verfrühtheit f; because of the untimeliness of his arrivalweil er zur falschen Zeit kam
References in periodicals archive ?
Murphy moved for a remand due to untimeliness under 28 U.
Somehow the clouded narcissism of these "opaque mirrors," imprinted with a statement that alternately suggests the acceleration of contemporary life and the untimeliness of art--as well as its promise of taking us out of time--captures for me the dilemma artists currently face, in this period of rampant professionalization and careerist profiteering.
On appeal of both rulings, the Eighth Circuit agreed with the district court's finding that plaintiff waived its right to seek a remand based on the untimeliness of the notice of removal.
THE UNTIMELINESS of Edward Said's death was persistently
A prevailing litigant who awaits the outcome of an appeal before filing a motion for fees, therefore, risks a judicial finding of untimeliness and a denial of requested fees.
The untimeliness of Golub's hybrid combinations accounts for the great success of his work of the early '80s.
Peter Boxall argues that untimeliness is a necessary component of any attempt to define the contemporary: 'The experience of the contemporary always involves a certain ejection from one's time, a certain failure of our capacity to frame it or picture it.
Feminist geophilosophy, by contrast, has begun to attend to the excess and untimeliness of the inhuman forces constitutive of thought.
If the terrain on which both the scientist as well as the philosopher move is already moveable in itself, how to make affirmations that contain universal untimeliness and validity?
The point of convergence with Nietzsche's story 'The Madman' are remarkable: (a) the revolution, the radical subversion of accepted values, goes unseen and unheard; (b) the decentred movement of the Earth calls for a creative act that is not understood by those who do not see its necessity; (c) the "great deed" of the loss of a cosmic centre requires the even greater event of an individual capable to become a new centre; (d) the untimeliness of the madman's message is echoed by Zarathustra's ghost's announce of a "high time", and by Zarathustra's description of the "stillest hours" as the moment for creative valuation.
In Victorian studies, queer theory, and postcolonial studies, critics have argued for untimeliness and temporal heterogeneity as important both to literary form and to the criticism that comprehends it.
Striving to capture what was still only possible to articulate, still on the tip of the tongue, when the codification of what we now call sexuality was already making itself felt, already tending to forestall that possible articulation, the explication of untimeliness proves at once elusive and transgressive.