unvaryingly


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unvaryingly

(ʌnˈvɛərɪɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a never changing manner
References in classic literature ?
It was impossible to have lived with her fifteen years and not be aware that an unselfish clinging to the right, and a sincerity clear as the flower-born dew, were her main characteristics; indeed, Godfrey felt this so strongly, that his own more wavering nature, too averse to facing difficulty to be unvaryingly simple and truthful, was kept in a certain awe of this gentle wife who watched his looks with a yearning to obey them.
The man whose prosperity she had shared through nearly half a life, and who had unvaryingly cherished her--now that punishment had befallen him it was not possible to her in any sense to forsake him.
Often, after a dreary trip round the offices of the music-publishers, she would howl bitterly in secret, and even gnaw her pillow in the watches of the night; but in public her pride kept her unvaryingly bright and cheerful.
Unvaryingly, students qualified from the religious institutes are more committed and motivated and committed as compare to the products of secular schooling system.
The upper part of this layer contained also Comb and Corded ware sherds and even slightly later finds, but the lower part yielded unvaryingly the Narva-type pottery (Jaanits 1965, 37).
However, Calvinism underscores the complete and utter abjection of human nature (including rational faculties) more stridently and unvaryingly than does Arminianism.
With the American K--12 system taking the form of a streamlined apparatus that has federal and state policy engaging directly with local monopolies, it becomes sensible to create simple performance metrics that can be applied unvaryingly across all schools.
That is, although based on different underlying metrics, countries unvaryingly display higher real scoring percentages than cities in e-government and e-governance.
As expected, the international community has unvaryingly condemned the tests.
1986) ("In those cases where the beneficiary alleged mismanagement or other errors in the administration of the estate, the courts have unvaryingly held that such objections do not violate the no-contest clause.
Taking her examples across several decades of cinema, Mulay inarguably--and hence uninterestingly--contends that "[t]hough the portrayal of White and Black women differed to some extent in Anglo-American and European cinema at certain times, both unvaryingly portrayed women as objects of masculine desire" (385).