upland sandpiper


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

upland sandpiper

n.
A large brownish sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) that breeds in fields and prairies of northern and central North America and winters in South America. Also called upland plover.

up′land sand′piper



n.
a short-billed North American sandpiper, Bartramia longicauda, of grasslands and cultivated fields.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.upland sandpiper - large plover-like sandpiper of North American fields and uplandsupland sandpiper - large plover-like sandpiper of North American fields and uplands
sandpiper - any of numerous usually small wading birds having a slender bill and piping call; closely related to the plovers
Bartramia, genus Bartramia - a genus of Scolopacidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Chicago Botanic Garden yielded least bittern, upland sandpiper and hoary redpoll.
The program has also been successful at creating habitat for many other species, including white-tailed deer, wild turkey, badger, eastern bluebird, snowshoe hare, upland sandpiper, indigo bunting, and brown-thrasher.
Less common grassland species, from most to least common, were sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis), upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda), dickcissel (Spiza americana), horned lark (Eremophila alpestris), vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) and western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta).
According to Bill Glass, the ecologist for the prairie, "Illinois's Department of Natural Resources found a number of threatened species of birds there," including the upland sandpiper, the bobolink and the loggerhead shrike.
Species on the sensitive list include the Oregon spotted frog, painted turtle, upland sandpiper and purple martin.
For example, the grassland nesting birds of highest management concern based on our ranks were the Henslow's sparrow, dickcissel (Spiza americana), and upland sandpiper (Table 2).
The bird-loving buddies were hoping to record exotic species like the Yellow-browed Warbler, the Upland Sandpiper and the Snow bunting.
All of which meant that building the complex would result in the permanent loss of a large wetland area, threatening habitat used by many bird species, among them the state endangered Upland Sandpiper.
The three species that we modeled to settle randomly, upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda), Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) and eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), had positive relationships between occurrence and field size when a complete census or proportional sampling was used, and therefore, would have been considered area sensitive by the methods used by some previous authors.
While turkeys are now common in New York State, upland sandpiper populations are falling as the grassland habitat they depend upon disappears.
The species considered were the greater prairiechicken (Tympanuchus cupido), upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), dickcissel (Spiza americana), savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) and field sparrow (Spizella pusilla).
During spring, summer and fall, the grasslands, woodlots and wetlands in these towns are also home to other rare visitors from afar, such as the upland sandpiper, unusual sparrows and even the loggerhead shrike.