uproar


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up·roar

 (ŭp′rôr′)
n.
1. A condition of noisy excitement and confusion; a tumult: "The uproar of the street sounded violently and hideously cacophonous" (Virginia Woolf). See Synonyms at noise.
2. An impassioned protest or heated controversy: The publication of the book caused an uproar.

[Probably by folk etymology from Middle Low German uprōr : up-, up (from up); see upo in Indo-European roots + rōr, motion; see kerə- in Indo-European roots.]

uproar

(ˈʌpˌrɔː)
n
a commotion or disturbance characterized by loud noise and confusion; turmoil

up•roar

(ˈʌpˌrɔr, -ˌroʊr)

n.
1. a state of violent and noisy disturbance, as of a multitude; turmoil.
2. an instance of this.
[1520–30; < Dutch oproer revolt, tumult, translation of German Aufruhr]

uproar

  • donnybrook - Donnybrook is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland, once famous for its annual fair and now used to describe a scene of uproar or disorder.
  • hurly-burly - Turmoil or an uproar.
  • rum - Once known as rumbo, rumbowling, rumbustion, or rumbullion—from a Devonshire word meaning "uproar."
  • stampede - From Mexican Spanish estampida, "crash, uproar."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusionuproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
combustion - a state of violent disturbance and excitement; "combustion grew until revolt was unavoidable"
2.uproar - loud confused noise from many sourcesuproar - loud confused noise from many sources
noise - sound of any kind (especially unintelligible or dissonant sound); "he enjoyed the street noises"; "they heard indistinct noises of people talking"; "during the firework display that ended the gala the noise reached 98 decibels"

uproar

noun
1. commotion, noise, racket, riot, confusion, turmoil, brawl, mayhem, clamour, din, turbulence, pandemonium, rumpus, hubbub, hurly-burly, brouhaha, ruction (informal), hullabaloo, ruckus (informal), bagarre (French) The announcement caused uproar in the crowd.
2. protest, outrage, criticism, complaint, objection, fuss, stink (informal), outcry, furore, hue and cry The announcement could cause an uproar in the United States.

uproar

noun
1. A condition of intense public interest or excitement:
Informal: to-do.
Slang: hoo-hah.
2. An interruption of regular procedure or of public peace:
Informal: flap, to-do.
3. Sounds or a sound, especially when loud, confused, or disagreeable:
4. Offensively loud and insistent utterances, especially of disapproval:
Idiom: hue and cry.
Translations
ضَجيج، صَخَب، ضَوْضاء
vřavazmatek
oprørtumult
háreysti; ringulreiî
aurošanakņadatroksnis

uproar

[ˈʌprɔːʳ] Nalboroto m, jaleo m
this caused an uproar; at this there was (an) uproar (= shouting) → en esto se armó un alboroto; (= protesting) → en esto estallaron ruidosas las protestas
the hall was in (an) uproar (= shouting, disturbance) → había alboroto en la sala; (= protesting) → se oían protestas airadas en la sala

uproar

[ˈʌprɔːr] n
(= noise) → tumulte m, vacarme m
to be in uproar (= chaos)
The courtroom was in uproar → Le tumulte régnait dans la salle du tribunal.
(= protest) → tollé m
to cause an uproar → provoquer un tollé, déclencher un tollé
an uproar over sth, an uproar about sth → une vague de protestations à propos de qch

uproar

nAufruhr m, → Tumult m; he tried to make himself heard above the uproarer versuchte, sich über den Lärm hinweg verständlich zu machen; at this there was uproar, this caused an uproardas verursachte einen (wahren) Aufruhr or Tumult; the whole room/town was in uproarder ganze Saal/die ganze Stadt war in Aufruhr

uproar

[ˈʌpˌrɔːʳ] ntrambusto, clamore m
the whole place was in uproar → c'era un gran baccano

uproar

(ˈaproː) noun
(an outbreak of) noise, shouting etc. The whole town was in (an) uproar after the football team's victory.
upˈroarious adjective
very noisy, especially with much laughter. The team were given an uproarious welcome.
upˈroariously adverb
References in classic literature ?
When I got back to the nursery there was such an uproar in the parlor that I looked in, and there was Mr.
The uproar which had so lately echoed through the vaults of the forest was gone, leaving the rush of the waters to swell and sink on the currents of the air, in the unmingled sweetness of nature.
This was made evident, one day, when a political procession, with hundreds of flaunting banners, and drums, fifes, clarions, and cymbals, reverberating between the rows of buildings, marched all through town, and trailed its length of trampling footsteps, and most infrequent uproar, past the ordinarily quiet House of the Seven Gables.
And then what a happiness would it have been could Hester Prynne have heard her clear, bird-like voice mingling with the uproar of other childish voices, and have distinguished and unravelled her own darling's tones, amid all the entangled outcry of a group of sportive children.
But sliding down the ropes like baleful comets, the two Canallers rushed into the uproar, and sought to drag their man out of it towards the forecastle.
in tones which made the orchestral uproar sound like fairy music.
In the height of the uproar and laughter, Sam, however, preserved an immovable gravity, only from time to time rolling his eyes up, and giving his auditors divers inexpressibly droll glances, without departing from the sententious elevation of his oratory.
The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackened; the schoolroom felt warmer than in the morning--its fires being allowed to burn a little more brightly, to supply, in some measure, the place of candles, not yet introduced: the ruddy gloaming, the licensed uproar, the confusion of many voices gave one a welcome sense of liberty.
This was Zillah, the stout housewife; who at length issued forth to inquire into the nature of the uproar.
Cruncher made out that some kind of funeral was coming along, and that there was popular objection to this funeral, which engendered uproar.
These provisions laid in, we went on through a great noise and uproar that confused my weary head beyond description, and over a bridge which, no doubt, was London Bridge (indeed I think he told me so, but I was half asleep), until we came to the poor person's house, which was a part of some alms-houses, as I knew by their look, and by an inscription on a stone over the gate which said they were established for twenty-five poor women.
Others with vast TYPHOEAN rage more fell Rend up both Rocks and Hills, and ride the Air In whirlwind; Hell scarce holds the wilde uproar.