uptalk


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up·talk

 (ŭp′tôk′)
n.
A manner of speaking in which declarative sentences are uttered with a rising intonation as though they were questions.

uptalk

(ˈʌpˌtɔːk)
n
(Linguistics) a style of speech in which every sentence ends with a rising tone, as if the speaker is always asking a question

up•talk

(ˈʌpˌtɔk)
n.
a rise in pitch at the end usu. of a declarative sentence, esp. if habitual: often represented in writing by a question mark as in Hi, I'm here to read the meter?
[1990–95]
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, a study by UK publisher Pearson found that a majority of bosses "believe uptalk hinders the prospects of promotion as well as better pay grades in their organization.
Washington, December 7 ( ANI ): New research has shown that the American English speech variant known as uptalk, or "Valley Girl speak" is expanding to other demographic groups, including males.
Researcher Amanda Ritchart, a linguist at the University of California, said that uptalk is becoming more prevalent and systematic in its use for the younger generations in Southern California and has transcended diverse socioeconomic status, ethnicity, bilingualism and gender boundaries.
The new study, which is also the first to identify the distinct melodic dialect marked by a rise in pitch at the ends of sentences, has busted the stereotype associated with uptalk that those who speak uptalk actually ask questions instead of make statements.
So does Current Okada, but not without provoking rancor from his manager, played with pitch-perfect uptalk by Mary McCool: "The problem is that, look, I don't want you to take this the wrong way, OK, but the reason you're able to say things like that is 72' because of your position, I mean, Okada, you are in many ways, you can afford a lot of freedom, you can't deny that.