urchin


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Related to urchin: sea urchin, sea urchin sting

ur·chin

 (ûr′chĭn)
n.
1. A playful or mischievous youngster; a scamp.
2. A sea urchin.
3. Archaic A hedgehog.

[Middle English urchone, hedgehog, from Old French erichon, from Vulgar Latin *ērīciō, ērīciōn-, from Latin ērīcius, from ēr.]

urchin

(ˈɜːtʃɪn)
n
1. a mischievous roguish child, esp one who is young, small, or raggedly dressed
2. (Animals) See sea urchin, heart urchin
3. (Animals) an archaic or dialect name for a hedgehog
4. (Mechanical Engineering) either of the two cylinders in a carding machine that are covered with carding cloth
5. (European Myth & Legend) obsolete an elf or sprite
[C13: urchon, from Old French heriçon, from Latin ēricius hedgehog, from ēr, related to Greek khēr hedgehog]

ur•chin

(ˈɜr tʃɪn)

n.
1. a mischievous boy.
2. any small boy or youngster.
4. Chiefly Brit. Dial. hedgehog.
[1300–50; Middle English urchun, urchon hedgehog < Old North French (h)erichon, Old French heriçun < Vulgar Latin *hēricionem, acc. of *hēriciō, for Latin ēricius]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.urchin - poor and often mischievous city childurchin - poor and often mischievous city child
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
ragamuffin, tatterdemalion - a dirty shabbily clothed urchin
guttersnipe, street urchin - a child who spends most of his time in the streets especially in slum areas

urchin

noun (Old-fashioned) ragamuffin, waif, guttersnipe, brat, mudlark (slang), gamin, street Arab (offensive), young rogue We were in the bazaar with all the little urchins watching us.
Translations
ولَد شَقي
uličník
gadedreng
götustrákur
vaikėzas
resgalis
haylaz oğlanyaramaz çocuk

urchin

[ˈɜːtʃɪn] Npilluelo/a m/f, golfillo/a m/f
sea urchinerizo m de mar

urchin

[ˈɜːrtʃɪn] ngarnement m

urchin

nGassenkind nt; (mischievous) → Range f

urchin

[ˈɜːtʃɪn] nmonello/a

urchin

(ˈəːtʃin) noun
a mischievous, usually dirty or ragged, child, especially a boy. He was chased by a crowd of urchins.
References in classic literature ?
The urchin looked proudly up in his face, but made no reply.
The door, which moved with difficulty on its creaking and rusty hinges, being forced quite open, a square and sturdy little urchin became apparent, with cheeks as red as an apple.
Your mere puny stripling, that winced at the least flourish of the rod, was passed by with indulgence; but the claims of justice were satisfied by inflicting a double portion on some little tough wrong headed, broad-skirted Dutch urchin, who sulked and swelled and grew dogged and sullen beneath the birch.
he added, as he stumbled over a sooty little urchin, who was crawling upon all fours.
There was not an urchin in school but was perishing to have a glimpse of it, but the chance never came.
He was never absent during business hours, unless upon an errand, and then he was represented by his son: a grisly urchin of twelve, who was his express image.
Upon which, Janet came running up the stairs as if the house were in flames, darted out on a little piece of green in front, and warned off two saddle-donkeys, lady-ridden, that had presumed to set hoof upon it; while my aunt, rushing out of the house, seized the bridle of a third animal laden with a bestriding child, turned him, led him forth from those sacred precincts, and boxed the ears of the unlucky urchin in attendance who had dared to profane that hallowed ground.
The mother, out of pure indulgence, took me up, and put me towards the child, who presently seized me by the middle, and got my head into his mouth, where I roared so loud that the urchin was frighted, and let me drop, and I should infallibly have broke my neck, if the mother had not held her apron under me.
Sancho changed the subject, and said to his master, "I marvel, senor, at the boldness of Altisidora, the duchess's handmaid; he whom they call Love must have cruelly pierced and wounded her; they say he is a little blind urchin who, though blear-eyed, or more properly speaking sightless, if he aims at a heart, be it ever so small, hits it and pierces it through and through with his arrows.
He remembered a Proudfoot he had seen at school, not known: a little, whey-faced urchin, the despicable member of some lower class.
Weena, who had been rolling a sea urchin down the sloping glass of a case, presently came, as I stared about me, and very quietly took my hand and stood beside me.
Perspiration streamed down the youth's face, which was soiled like that of a weeping urchin.