utilitarianism


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u·til·i·tar·i·an·ism

 (yo͞o-tĭl′ĭ-târ′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief that the value of a thing or an action is determined by its utility.
2. The ethical theory proposed by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill that all action should be directed toward achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people.
3. The quality of being utilitarian: housing of bleak utilitarianism.

utilitarianism

(juːˌtɪlɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the morally correct course of action consists in the greatest good for the greatest number, that is, in maximizing the total benefit resulting, without regard to the distribution of benefits and burdens
2. (Philosophy) the theory that the criterion of virtue is utility

u•til•i•tar•i•an•ism

(yuˌtɪl ɪˈtɛər i əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the ethical doctrine that virtue is based on utility, and that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons.
2. utilitarian quality or character.
[1820–30]

utilitarianism

the ethical doctrine that virtue is based upon utility and that behavior should have as its goal the procurement of the greatest happiness for the greatest number of persons. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Ethics
the philosophical tenets set forth by John Stuart Mill based on the principle of “the greatest good for the greatest number” and holding that the criterion of virtue lies in its utility. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

utilitarianism

A philosophical school of thought arguing that ethics must be based on whatever brings the greatest amount of good to the greatest number of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utilitarianism - doctrine that the useful is the good; especially as elaborated by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill; the aim was said to be the greatest happiness for the greatest number
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

utilitarianism

[ˌjuːtɪlɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Nutilitarismo m

utilitarianism

n (Philos) → Utilitarismus m
References in classic literature ?
But knockers may be muffled for other purposes than those of mere utilitarianism, as, in the present instance, was clearly shown.
She had not, indeed, surrendered her money; in that there would have been a romantic or monkish abandon quite alien to her masterful utilitarianism.
In the earlier series of books containing, among others, Bosanquet's "History of Aesthetic," Pfleiderer's "Rational Theology since Kant," Albee's "History of English Utilitarianism," Bonar's "Philosophy and Political Economy," Brett's "History of Psychology," Ritchie's "Natural Rights," these objects were to a large extent effected.
Yet despite this endorsement of Aristotle, Fisher believes that no single moral theory--Aristotelian virtue ethics, utilitarianism, deontology--adequately accounts for the complexity of our contemporary moral lives.
Critics often charge that utilitarianism cannot adequately account for our obligation to keep our promises.
The concept of utilitarianism has gone too far when people are written off as being unemployable at 55, or because they have had a mental illness, or learning problem.
Classical liberalism is built on ideas that had already arisen by the end of the 18th century, such as selected ideas of Adam Smith, John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Malthus, and David Ricardo, stressing the belief in free market and natural law, utilitarianism, and progress.
Even if the product is highly utilitarian, such as a mobile phone, we observed that it has lost its utilitarianism properties, which are now secondary factors.
Act utilitarianism focuses on how specific acts affect the total sum of a society's happiness.
The crux of the problem lies in the ways in which the terms utilitarian, utility, and utilitarianism are described, used, and understood to characterize how arts education has traditionally been justified in public education in the United States.
Maybe it's the utilitarianism of the tool, the fact that anyone (using either Apple's iOS or Google's Android) can be a photographer, artist, and curator.
He presents an intriguing analysis of possible interpretations of the experience-machine example as a critique of utilitarianism or any form of hedonism, contending that they all fail.