utopian socialism


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Related to utopian socialism: Scientific Socialism, Fabian socialism

utopian socialism

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (sometimes capitals) socialism established by the peaceful surrender of the means of production by capitalists moved by moral persuasion, example, etc: the form of socialism advocated by Robert Owen, Fichte, and others. Compare scientific socialism

utopian socialism

an economie theory based on the premise that voluntary surrender by capital of the means of production would bring about the end of poverty and unemployment. Cf. socialism.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utopian socialism - socialism achieved by voluntary sacrifice
socialism - a political theory advocating state ownership of industry
References in periodicals archive ?
While the story of New Australia often concludes at this point--particularly within largely hostile press accounts--the Paraguayan experiment in utopian socialism did not come to an end.
Set in Botswana before the end of apartheid, this novel, through a feminist anthropologist's pursuit of a utopian socialism, asks: What do men and women really want?
Chapter 3, "Castles in the Air: Marx, Engels and Utopian Socialism," is a methodical and illuminating study of Marx's and Engels's love-hate relationship with utopian socialism.
Articles averaging a little under a page in length describe such aspects as Brook Farm in 19th-century Massachusetts, Heaven's Gate community founded in 1970 and ended in mass suicide in 1997, William Morris' 1891 romantic utopian novel , and utopian socialism.
Thompson's book on William Morris, that nineteenth-century utopian socialism lay behind gay experiments in communal living during the early 1970s is a bit of a stretch.
In "Barbarism and the 'New Goths': The Controversial Germanic Origins of Morris's Utopian Socialism," Vita Fortunati of the University of Bologna argues that Morris' attempts to fuse ideals of fellowship in medieval Icelandic life led to "a clash rather than a merger" and finds a "deep hiatus between the Victorian notion of the barbarian located at the beginning of the civilizing process, and consequently rich in utopian potentialities, and the idea of the barbarian as the exponent of an already refined civilization" (p.
Instead, he went on to university and ended up with a PhD on utopian socialism with special reference to the early-19th-century French theorist Henri de Saint-Simon.