utopianism


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u·to·pi·an·ism

also U·to·pi·an·ism  (yo͞o-tō′pē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The ideals or principles of a utopian; idealistic and impractical social theory.

utopianism

1. the views and habits of mind of a visionary or idealist, sometimes beyond realization.
2. impracticable schemes of political and social reform. — utopian, utopianist, utopist, n., adj.
See also: Utopia
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Utopianism - the political orientation of a Utopian who believes in impossibly idealistic schemes of social perfection
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations

Utopianism

[juːˈtəʊpɪənɪzəm] Nutopismo m

Utopianism

nUtopismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
It was this pragmatic progressivism, not socialist utopianism, that extinguished classical liberalism as the general philosophy of American government.
Acosta's excellent recent study of Genesis and utopianism in the long eighteenth century is structured chronologically, with a chapter each on Milton, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, and Mary Shelley.
After charting the course of millenarian utopianism from early Christianity through the French Revolution and other political upheavals, Gray (European thought, London School of Economics, UK) sets forth an argument that utopianism has dangerously infected the politics of the United States in the form of the neoconservative "War on Terror.
At a moment in which the ideological crises of recent decades have practically given way to the all-purpose utopianism of the global, critic and curator Marco Meneguzzo turns for answers to the art of the present.
This jumble of earnest ignorance, dogmatic arrogance, naive utopianism, unabashed political special pleading, and uncritical faith in what has come to be known in the humanities and many of the social sciences as "postmodern theory" constitutes the platform of the "academic left" mentioned in the subtitle of Higher Superstition: The Academic Left and Its Quarrels with Science, by Paul R.
Monaco misses an opportunity to integrate Levy's Pilgrimage more completely into the broader context of nineteenth-century utopianism.
Arguing against idealism and utopianism, he advocated value pluralism ("the one and the many").
Using texts and photos, Fezer and Wieder reconstructed the biography of Eileen Gray to consider the lost utopianism of modern architecture.
In the introduction to Rads, his 1992 book about the 1970 bombing of the University of Wisconsin's Army Math Research Center (the "Hiroshima of the New Left"), Tom Bates writes, "The political utopianism, drug experimentation, and sexual license that I and my contemporaries had innocently associated with liberation looked completely different to me now.
Passing in turn from his synthesis of Husserl and Schleiermacher to beyond Heidegger's hermeneutics of text-in-action, Ricoeur takes a dynamic approach as he evaluates hermeneutical phenomenology, including the function of distanciation within it and the influence of philosophical and biblical hermeneutics, the transition from the hermeneutics of texts to that of action, in which Ricoeur finds meaningful action considered as a text, and the applications of these hermeneutics into ideology and politics, with an emphasis on utopianism.
Since its founding in 2003, the Centre has encouraged research in all aspects of utopianism, but it has a particular commitment to the comparative study of utopianism in Irish culture.
This humanistic utopianism has a distinctly Beuysian ring.