utterance


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Related to utterance: unredressed

ut·ter·ance 1

 (ŭt′ər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act of uttering; vocal expression.
b. The power of speaking; speech: as long as I have utterance.
c. A manner of speaking: argued with forceful utterance.
2. Something uttered or expressed; a statement.

ut·ter·ance 2

 (ŭt′ər-əns)
n.
The uttermost end or extremity; the bitter end.

[Middle English, from Old French outrance, from outrer, to go beyond limits, from Vulgar Latin *ultrāre, from Latin ultrā, beyond; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

utterance

(ˈʌtərəns)
n
1. something uttered, such as a statement
2. the act or power of uttering or the ability to utter
3. (Logic) logic philosophy an element of spoken language, esp a sentence. Compare inscription4
4. (Philosophy) logic philosophy an element of spoken language, esp a sentence. Compare inscription4

utterance

(ˈʌtərəns)
n
archaic or literary the bitter end (esp in the phrase to the utterance)
[C13: from Old French oultrance, from oultrer to carry to excess, from Latin ultrā beyond]

ut•ter•ance1

(ˈʌt ər əns)

n.
1. an act of uttering; vocal expression.
2. something uttered.
3. manner or power of speaking.
4. Ling. any speech sequence consisting of one or more words and preceded and followed by silence or a change in speaker.
[1400–50]

ut•ter•ance2

(ˈʌt ər əns)

n. Archaic.
the utmost extremity, esp. death.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French oultr(er) to pass beyond (see outrage)]

utterance

  • dixit - An utterance.
  • affective - Describing the emotional meaning of an utterance.
  • curse - First an utterance of God or other deity.
  • preceding, previous - Preceding means "occurring immediately before the time of the utterance," while previous means "occurring at some time before the utterance."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utterance - the use of uttered sounds for auditory communication
roll call - calling out an official list of names
auditory communication - communication that relies on hearing
speech sound, phone, sound - (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language
cry, outcry, shout, vociferation, yell, call - a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience"
cry, yell - a loud utterance of emotion (especially when inarticulate); "a cry of rage"; "a yell of pain"
croak, croaking - a harsh hoarse utterance (as of a frog)
exclaiming, exclamation - an abrupt excited utterance; "she gave an exclamation of delight"; "there was much exclaiming over it"
expletive - a word or phrase conveying no independent meaning but added to fill out a sentence or metrical line
groan, moan - an utterance expressing pain or disapproval
ahem, hem - the utterance of a sound similar to clearing the throat; intended to get attention, express hesitancy, fill a pause, hide embarrassment, warn a friend, etc.
howl, howling, ululation - a long loud emotional utterance; "he gave a howl of pain"; "howls of laughter"; "their howling had no effect"
laugh, laughter - the sound of laughing
mumble - a soft indistinct utterance
paging - calling out the name of a person (especially by a loudspeaker system); "the public address system in the hospital was used for paging"
profanity - vulgar or irreverent speech or action
pronunciation - the manner in which someone utters a word; "they are always correcting my pronunciation"
exultation, rejoicing, jubilation - the utterance of sounds expressing great joy
sigh, suspiration - an utterance made by exhaling audibly
snarl - a vicious angry growl
speaking, speech production - the utterance of intelligible speech
speech - something spoken; "he could hear them uttering merry speeches"
splutter, sputter - an utterance (of words) with spitting sounds (as in rage)
rasp, rasping - uttering in an irritated tone
growling - a gruff or angry utterance (suggestive of the growling of an animal)

utterance

utterance

noun
1. The act or an instance of expressing in words:
2. The use of the speech organs to produce sounds:
3. The faculty, act, or product of speaking:
4. Something said:
Translations
prohlášenívyjádřenívyřčenívýrok

utterance

[ˈʌtərəns] N
1. (= remark) → palabras fpl, declaración f
2. (= expression) → expresión f
to give utterance toexpresar, manifestar, declarar
3. (= style) → pronunciación f, articulación f

utterance

[ˈʌtərəns] nparoles fpl

utterance

n
(= sth said)Äußerung f; the child’s first utterancesdie ersten Worte des Kindes; his last utteranceseine letzten Worte; his recent utterances in the pressseine jüngsten Presseäußerungen
(= act of speaking)Sprechen nt; upon her dying father’s utterance of her nameals ihr sterbender Vater ihren Namen nannte; to give utterance to a feelingeinem Gefühl Ausdruck geben or verleihen (geh), → ein Gefühl zum Ausdruck bringen

utterance

[ˈʌtrns] n (remark, statement) → parole fpl; (expression) → espressione f
References in classic literature ?
No one now needed to "feel" him; no one mistook his front for his back; all his movements were readily ascertained by his neighbours without the slightest strain on their powers of calculation; no one jostled him, or failed to make way for him; his voice was saved the labour of that exhausting utterance by which we colourless Squares and Pentagons are often forced to proclaim our individuality when we move amid a crowd of ignorant Isosceles.
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
NOT long ago, the writer of these lines, In the mad pride of intellectuality, Maintained "the power of words"--denied that ever A thought arose within the human brain Beyond the utterance of the human tongue: And now, as if in mockery of that boast, Two words-two foreign soft dissyllables-- Italian tones, made only to be murmured By angels dreaming in the moonlit "dew That hangs like chains of pearl on Hermon hill,"-- Have stirred from out the abysses of his heart, Unthought-like thoughts that are the souls of thought, Richer, far wider, far diviner visions Than even the seraph harper, Israfel,(Who has "the sweetest voice of all God's creatures") Could hope to utter.
This was followed by a great down-pour of rain, which washed the unfortunate Officer of the Government and the outfit off the face of creation and affected the agricultural heart with joy too deep for utterance.
IT would have been sad, indeed, to lose you in such manner, my old friend,” said Oliver, catching his breath for utterance.
He turned and lurched out of the place, the moral effect of his utterance largely spoiled by the fact that he was so patently full while he uttered it.
how far beyond all utterance are your linked analogies
You mustn't trifle with it, you know, or it may turn to pneumonia," she would go on, deriving much comfort from the utterance of that foreign word, incomprehensible to others as well as to herself.
When I think that I cannot SEE YOU AGAIN my heart is almost TOO FULL FOR UTTERANCE.
Of the Muses who make a man very wise, marvellous in utterance.
She had never anticipated that the utterance of love would produce such a powerful effect on her.
As to Captain Lydgate himself, his low brow, his aquiline nose bent on one side, and his rather heavy utterance, might have been disadvantageous in any young gentleman who had not a military bearing and mustache to give him what is doted on by some flower-like blond heads as "style.