utterance


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Related to utterance: unredressed

ut·ter·ance 1

 (ŭt′ər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act of uttering; vocal expression.
b. The power of speaking; speech: as long as I have utterance.
c. A manner of speaking: argued with forceful utterance.
2. Something uttered or expressed; a statement.

ut·ter·ance 2

 (ŭt′ər-əns)
n.
The uttermost end or extremity; the bitter end.

[Middle English, from Old French outrance, from outrer, to go beyond limits, from Vulgar Latin *ultrāre, from Latin ultrā, beyond; see al-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

utterance

(ˈʌtərəns)
n
1. something uttered, such as a statement
2. the act or power of uttering or the ability to utter
3. (Logic) logic philosophy an element of spoken language, esp a sentence. Compare inscription4
4. (Philosophy) logic philosophy an element of spoken language, esp a sentence. Compare inscription4

utterance

(ˈʌtərəns)
n
archaic or literary the bitter end (esp in the phrase to the utterance)
[C13: from Old French oultrance, from oultrer to carry to excess, from Latin ultrā beyond]

ut•ter•ance1

(ˈʌt ər əns)

n.
1. an act of uttering; vocal expression.
2. something uttered.
3. manner or power of speaking.
4. Ling. any speech sequence consisting of one or more words and preceded and followed by silence or a change in speaker.
[1400–50]

ut•ter•ance2

(ˈʌt ər əns)

n. Archaic.
the utmost extremity, esp. death.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French oultr(er) to pass beyond (see outrage)]

utterance

  • dixit - An utterance.
  • affective - Describing the emotional meaning of an utterance.
  • curse - First an utterance of God or other deity.
  • preceding, previous - Preceding means "occurring immediately before the time of the utterance," while previous means "occurring at some time before the utterance."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utterance - the use of uttered sounds for auditory communication
roll call - calling out an official list of names
auditory communication - communication that relies on hearing
speech sound, phone, sound - (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language
cry, outcry, shout, vociferation, yell, call - a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience"
cry, yell - a loud utterance of emotion (especially when inarticulate); "a cry of rage"; "a yell of pain"
croak, croaking - a harsh hoarse utterance (as of a frog)
exclaiming, exclamation - an abrupt excited utterance; "she gave an exclamation of delight"; "there was much exclaiming over it"
expletive - a word or phrase conveying no independent meaning but added to fill out a sentence or metrical line
groan, moan - an utterance expressing pain or disapproval
ahem, hem - the utterance of a sound similar to clearing the throat; intended to get attention, express hesitancy, fill a pause, hide embarrassment, warn a friend, etc.
howl, howling, ululation - a long loud emotional utterance; "he gave a howl of pain"; "howls of laughter"; "their howling had no effect"
laugh, laughter - the sound of laughing
mumble - a soft indistinct utterance
paging - calling out the name of a person (especially by a loudspeaker system); "the public address system in the hospital was used for paging"
profanity - vulgar or irreverent speech or action
pronunciation - the manner in which someone utters a word; "they are always correcting my pronunciation"
exultation, rejoicing, jubilation - the utterance of sounds expressing great joy
sigh, suspiration - an utterance made by exhaling audibly
snarl - a vicious angry growl
speaking, speech production - the utterance of intelligible speech
speech - something spoken; "he could hear them uttering merry speeches"
splutter, sputter - an utterance (of words) with spitting sounds (as in rage)
rasp, rasping - uttering in an irritated tone
growling - a gruff or angry utterance (suggestive of the growling of an animal)

utterance

utterance

noun
1. The act or an instance of expressing in words:
2. The use of the speech organs to produce sounds:
3. The faculty, act, or product of speaking:
4. Something said:
Translations
prohlášenívyjádřenívyřčenívýrok

utterance

[ˈʌtərəns] N
1. (= remark) → palabras fpl, declaración f
2. (= expression) → expresión f
to give utterance toexpresar, manifestar, declarar
3. (= style) → pronunciación f, articulación f

utterance

[ˈʌtərəns] nparoles fpl

utterance

n
(= sth said)Äußerung f; the child’s first utterancesdie ersten Worte des Kindes; his last utteranceseine letzten Worte; his recent utterances in the pressseine jüngsten Presseäußerungen
(= act of speaking)Sprechen nt; upon her dying father’s utterance of her nameals ihr sterbender Vater ihren Namen nannte; to give utterance to a feelingeinem Gefühl Ausdruck geben or verleihen (geh), → ein Gefühl zum Ausdruck bringen

utterance

[ˈʌtrns] n (remark, statement) → parole fpl; (expression) → espressione f
References in classic literature ?
And Amy went on with her work, in the proud consciousness of virtue and the successful utterance of two long words in a breath.
After he had faced the bitter fact that he was to leave the `Aeneid' unfinished, and had decreed that the great canvas, crowded with figures of gods and men, should be burned rather than survive him unperfected, then his mind must have gone back to the perfect utterance of the `Georgics,' where the pen was fitted to the matter as the plough is to the furrow; and he must have said to himself, with the thankfulness of a good man,
As minute after minute passed by, leaving them in undisturbed security, the insinuating feeling of hope was gradually gaining possession of every bosom, though each one felt reluctant to give utterance to expectations that the next moment might so fearfully destroy.
It was strangely indistinct, however, and less like articulate words than an unshaped sound, such as would be the utterance of feeling and sympathy, rather than of the intellect.
But, as thoughts are frozen and utterance benumbed, unless the speaker stand in some true relation with his audience, it may be pardonable to imagine that a friend, a kind and apprehensive, though not the closest friend, is listening to our talk; and then, a native reserve being thawed by this genial consciousness, we may prate of the circumstances that lie around us, and even of ourself, but still keep the inmost Me behind its veil.
I approached it from one side and the other while, in my room, I flung myself about, but I always broke down in the monstrous utterance of names.
But being now interrupted, he put up the image; and pretty soon, going to the table, took up a large book there, and placing it on his lap began counting the pages with deliberate regularity; at every fiftieth page --as I fancied --stopping a moment, looking vacantly around him, and giving utterance to a long-drawn gurgling whistle of astonishment.
how far beyond all utterance are your linked analogies
Tom spoke with a thick utterance, and with a bitter choking in his throat,--but he spoke brave and strong.
The old abbot could not speak a word, for tears and the chokings in his throat; without utterance of any sort, he folded me in his arms and mashed me.
After apologizing for his ignorance, and reminding the audience that slav- ery was a poor school for the human intellect and heart, he proceeded to narrate some of the facts in his own history as a slave, and in the course of his speech gave utterance to many noble thoughts and thrilling reflections.
Weston kissed her with tears of joy; and when she could find utterance, assured her, that this protestation had done her more good than any thing else in the world could do.