vade mecum


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va·de me·cum

 (vā′dē mē′kəm, vä′dē mā′-)
n. pl. va·de me·cums
1. A useful thing that one constantly carries about.
2. A book, such as a guidebook, for ready reference.

[Latin vāde mēcum, go with me : vāde, sing. imperative of vādere, to go + : ablative sing. of egō, I + cum, with.]

vade mecum

(ˈvɑːdɪ ˈmeɪkʊm)
n
a handbook or other aid carried on the person for immediate use when needed
[C17: from Latin, literally: go with me]

va•de me•cum

(ˈveɪ di ˈmi kəm, ˈvɑ-)

n., pl. vade me•cums.
1. something a person carries about for frequent or regular use.
2. a book for ready reference; manual; handbook.
[1620–30; < Latin vāde mēcum literally, go with me]

vade mecum

A Latin phrase meaning go with me, used to mean a guidebook that someone carries around.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vade mecum - a concise reference book providing specific information about a subject or locationvade mecum - a concise reference book providing specific information about a subject or location
book of facts, reference book, reference work, reference - a book to which you can refer for authoritative facts; "he contributed articles to the basic reference work on that topic"
manual - a small handbook
bible - a book regarded as authoritative in its field
guidebook, guide - something that offers basic information or instruction
ready reckoner, reckoner - a handbook of tables used to facilitate computation
Translations
käsikirja

vade mecum

[ˈvɑːdɪˈmeɪkʊm] Nvademécum m

vade mecum

n (liter)Vademekum nt (liter)

vade mecum

[ˈvɑːdɪˈmeɪkʊm] n (liter) → vademecum m inv
References in classic literature ?
With such a VADE MECUM D'Artagnan was morally and physically an exact copy of the hero of Cervantes, to whom we so happily compared him when our duty of an historian placed us under the necessity of sketching his portrait.
Disdainful of exams, Hector chooses education in its widest sense as a vade mecum to inspire his pupils and bring them into the world and all its fascinations.
Lundberg goes on to highlight the presence of a vade mecum for would-be authors adapted from Tierney of Indiana University and available by clicking on http://images.
Compared to Walffid Kujalas The Flutist's Vade Mecum and Taffanel and Gaubert's 17 Big Daily Finger Exercises, The Complete Scale Compendium for Flute falls slightly short in the "completeness" suggested by the title yet provides a suitable foundation for a wide variety of scales.
The utility of a single-volume vade mecum is clear.
s adapting the Exercises to a remarkably diverse group of exercitants is an exceptionally valuable resource, a vade mecum, for those who are either making the Exercises or directing them.
written between 1731 and 1740) included are: The Apprentice's Vade Mecum, A Seasonable Examination of the Pleas and Pretensions, verses from the Gentleman's Magazine of 1736, his Preface to A Collection of Entertaining Histories and Novels, Aesop's Fables, Letters Written to and for Particular Friends, and Six Original Letters upon Duelling although the last two appeared in 1741 and 1765 respectively.
In its brief space, Bray-brooke provides a compendious vade mecum for the dialogue participant.
may well be on its way to a "postmortem" state--a state that evidently began "around 1985"--"1985" indeed being (ironically) Lawrence's centennial, but also a time when Terry Eagleton's trendy, relatively readable (and shallow) left-wing vade mecum Literary Theory dominated literary-cultural academia and did considerable damage to Lawrence/Leavis as the mean-spirited Eagleton derided the Lawrentian-Leavisite reverence for life (Eagleton, Literary Theory, pp.
The sources consulted are given in three different places: a list of recommended works follows the vade mecum, works cited in the checklist immediately precede that section of the book, and other works consulted appear at the end of the volume.
It is instead a philosophy of nature in the more popular sense of a creed or handbook, a vade mecum or pathway whose primary function is to advance the reader--in this case, 'humankind' in general--towards what Foss believes is its naturally evolving place as 'Earth's destiny' (300).