vagabond


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vag·a·bond

 (văg′ə-bŏnd′)
n.
A person who moves from place to place without a permanent home and often without a regular means of support.
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of a vagabond.
intr.v. vag·a·bond·ed, vag·a·bond·ing, vag·a·bonds
To wander or travel about, especially as a vagabond.

[Middle English vagabonde, from Old French vagabond, from Late Latin vagābundus, wandering, from Latin vagārī, to wander, from vagus, wandering.]

vag′a·bond′age n.
vag′a·bond′ism n.

vagabond

(ˈvæɡəˌbɒnd)
n
1. a person with no fixed home
2. an idle wandering beggar or thief
3. (modifier) of or like a vagabond; shiftless or idle
[C15: from Latin vagābundus wandering, from vagārī to roam, from vagus vague]
ˈvagaˌbondage n
ˈvagaˌbondish adj
ˈvagaˌbondism n

vag•a•bond

(ˈvæg əˌbɒnd)

adj.
1. wandering from place to place without any settled home; nomadic.
2. leading an unsettled or carefree life.
3. disreputable; worthless; shiftless.
4. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a vagabond.
5. having an uncertain or irregular course or direction: a vagabond voyage.
n.
6. a person who wanders from place to place; nomad.
7. an idle wanderer without a permanent home or visible means of support; tramp; vagrant.
8. a carefree, worthless, or irresponsible person; rogue.
[1400–50; < Late Latin vagābundus < Latin vagā(rī) to wander + -bundus adj. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagabond - anything that resembles a vagabond in having no fixed placevagabond - anything that resembles a vagabond in having no fixed place; "pirate ships were vagabonds of the sea"
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
2.vagabond - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of supportvagabond - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
beachcomber - a vagrant living on a beach
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
sundowner - a tramp who habitually arrives at sundown
hobo, tramp, bum - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
bird of passage, roamer, rover, wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
Verb1.vagabond - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentvagabond - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
Adj.1.vagabond - wandering aimlessly without ties to a place or communityvagabond - wandering aimlessly without ties to a place or community; "led a vagabond life"; "a rootless wanderer"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"
2.vagabond - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to anothervagabond - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another; "a drifting double-dealer"; "the floating population"; "vagrant hippies of the sixties"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

vagabond

noun
1. tramp, bum (informal), drifter, vagrant, migrant, rolling stone, wanderer, beggar, outcast, rover, nomad, itinerant, down-and-out, hobo (U.S.), bag lady (chiefly U.S.), wayfarer, dosser (Brit. slang), knight of the road, person of no fixed address He had lived as a vagabond, begging for food.

vagabond

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations
مُتَشَرِّد، أفّاق
-čkatulák
vagabond
asunnotonirtolainenkulkuripummireissata
flækingur
放浪する放浪者流浪する
dīkdienisklaidonis

vagabond

[ˈvægəbɒnd]
A. ADJvagabundo
B. Nvagabundo/a m/f

vagabond

[ˈvægəbɒnd] n (old-fashioned)vagabond(e) m/f

vagabond

nVagabund m, → Landstreicher(in) m(f)
adjvagabundenhaft; personvagabundierend, umherziehend; thoughts(ab)schweifend; vagabond lifeVagabundenleben nt

vagabond

[ˈvægəˌbɒnd] nvagabondo/a, barbone/a

vagabond

(ˈvӕgəbond) noun
an old word for a person having no settled home, or roving from place to place, especially in an idle or disreputable manner. rogues and vagabonds.
References in classic literature ?
It would be an ugly business, indeed, if Judge Pyncheon (who would not have cared a fig for Paganini's fiddle in his most harmonious mood) should make his appearance at the door, with a bloody shirt-bosom, and a grim frown on his swarthily white visage, and motion the foreign vagabond away
Once a vagabond on his own canal, I have received good turns from one of these Canallers; I thank him heartily; would fain be not ungrateful; but it is often one of the prime redeeming qualities of your man of violence, that at times he has as stiff an arm to back a poor stranger in a strait, as to plunder a wealthy one.
The blows of the basement hammer every day grew more and more between; and each blow every day grew fainter than the last; the wife sat frozen at the window, with tearless eyes, glitteringly gazing into the weeping faces of her children; the bellows fell; the forge choked up with cinders; the house was sold; the mother dived down into the long church-yard grass; her children twice followed her thither; and the houseless, familyless old man staggered off a vagabond in crape; his every woe unreverenced; his grey head a scorn to flaxen curls
These were strange words to the vagabond boy's ears, and the pleasantest he had ever heard.
Not only those who knew Aladdin when he played in the streets like a vagabond did not know him again; those who had seen him but a little while before hardly knew him, so much were his features altered; such were the effects of the lamp, as to procure by degrees to those who possessed it, perfections agreeable to the rank the right use of it advanced them to.
Hindley calls him a vagabond, and won't let him sit with us, nor eat with us any more; and, he says, he and I must not play together, and threatens to turn him out of the house if we break his orders.
The first subject to which she returned was the vagabond subject of Captain Wragge.
I know that, but for the mercy of God, I might easily have been, for any care that was taken of me, a little robber or a little vagabond.
We told him why we wanted him to come into the kitchen, and he slowly laid down his hammer, wiped his brow with his arm, took another wipe at it with his apron, and came slouching out, with a curious loose vagabond bend in the knees that strongly distinguished him.
It is like a sheep-dog, always running backwards and forwards, poking into the most out-of-the-way corners, now climbing at a run some steep hummock of the down, and now leisurely going miles about to escape an ant-hill; and all the time (here, by the way, ends the sheep-dog) it is stopping to gossip with rillets vagabond as itself, or loitering to bedeck itself with flowers.
To Heav'n thir prayers Flew up, nor missed the way, by envious windes Blow'n vagabond or frustrate: in they passd Dimentionless through Heav'nly dores; then clad With incense, where the Golden Altar fum'd, By thir great Intercessor, came in sight Before the Fathers Throne: Them the glad Son Presenting, thus to intercede began.
Or is there such virtue in the rude rhymes of a wandering bard, that domestic love, kindly affection, peace and happiness, are so wildly bartered, to become the hero of those ballads which vagabond minstrels sing to drunken churls over their evening ale?