vaginally


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vag·i·nal

 (văj′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the vagina.
2. Relating to or resembling a sheath.

vag′i·nal·ly adv.

vaginally

(vəˈdʒaɪnəlɪ)
adv
(Anatomy) via the vagina
References in periodicals archive ?
While it is much easier to perform a C section than successfully deliver a breech baby vaginally, said Glezerman, many women can benefit medically by the return to traditional techniques.
I use the oral route because I tend to find the medication undissolved at the introitus mostly when prescribed vaginally.
Respiratory morbidity was significantly higher in neonates delivered by elective cesarean section than in those delivered vaginally, Dr.
1) In a randomized controlled real, the average time from the start of the procedure to delivery of the placenta was 3-13 hours longer for those given misoprostol orally than for those who received it vaginally or who received intra-amniotic prostaglandin.
Three quarters of the babies born with vacuum extraction, 33% of the babies born vaginally, and only 7% of those born by cesarean section had retinal hemorrhaging.
Each woman was randomly assigned to give birth either vaginally or via C-section.
Afraid to stimulate too much blood loss with a Caesarean section, physicians helped Angela deliver the baby vaginally.
PROCHIEVE([R]) 8% (progesterone gel) is a bioadhesive product that utilizes Columbia's proprietary Bioadhesive Delivery System (BDS) to deliver natural progesterone vaginally in a convenient and patient-friendly, pre-filled, tampon-like applicator.
The stillborn fetus was delivered vaginally several hours later, when a >60% placental abruption was found.
They have established that when high levels of lactic acid are measured in the amniotic fluid, it is unlikely the mother will deliver vaginally.
Mothers with less than a high school education were more likely to deliver vaginally in the late preterm period, while those with a college education were more likely to deliver by C-section at term.
Babies born by planned caesarean section are up to four times more likely to suffer from general and serious breathing problems in the first days of life compared with newborns delivered vaginally or by emergency caesarean section.