vagrancy


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va·gran·cy

 (vā′grən-sē)
n. pl. va·gran·cies
1.
a. The state of being a vagrant.
b. The conduct or mode of existence of a vagrant.
c. The offense of being a vagrant: arrested for vagrancy.
2. An erratic notion or unpredictable action: the vagrancies of the heart.
3. An unpredictable development or change of circumstances: the vagrancies of the book business.

vagrancy

(ˈveɪɡrənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. the state or condition of being a vagrant
2. the conduct or mode of living of a vagrant

va•gran•cy

(ˈveɪ grən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the state or condition of being a vagrant.
2. the conduct of a vagrant.
3. reverie.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagrancy - the state of wandering from place to placevagrancy - the state of wandering from place to place; having no permanent home or means of livelihood
homelessness - the state or condition of having no home (especially the state of living in the streets)

vagrancy

noun homelessness, roaming, roving, rootlessness, nomadism, itinerancy, vagabondism Vagrancy and begging are commonplace in London.
Translations
تَشَرُّد
potulkatoulání
vagabondering
csavargás
flækingur, flækingslíf
potulka
avarelikserserilik

vagrancy

[ˈveɪgrənsɪ] Nvagancia f, vagabundeo m

vagrancy

[ˈveɪgrənsi] nvagabondage m

vagrancy

nLand-/Stadtstreicherei f (also Jur)

vagrancy

[ˈveɪgrnsɪ] nvagabondaggio

vagrant

(ˈveigrənt) noun
a person who has no fixed home; a tramp.
ˈvagrancy noun
the state of being a vagrant. Vagrancy is a crime in some countries.
References in classic literature ?
I didn't care for the drinking, nor the vagrancy of it, and I wandered back to the Oakland Free Library and read the books with greater understanding.
Our instructed vagrancy, which was hardly time to linger by the hedgerows, but runs away early to the tropics, and is at home with palms and banyans,--which is nourished on books of travel and stretches the theatre of its imagination to the Zambesi,--can hardly get a dim notion of what an old-fashioned man like Tulliver felt for this spot, where all his memories centred, and where life seemed like a familiar smooth-handled tool that the fingers clutch with loving ease.
I had come out of Kingston Jail last on a vagrancy committal.
And even there they were frustrated, for stringent vagrancy laws were passed and rigidly enforced.
The crime of not earning a living, in their case, is called vagrancy.
The task of recalling him from the vagrancy into which he always sank when he had spoken, was like recalling some very weak person from a swoon, or endeavouring, in the hope of some disclosure, to stay the spirit of a fast-dying man.
He further added that a beggar could be imprisoned for at least three months to two years under the Vagrancy Ordinance 1958 but the department was not authorised to do so.
A number of possibilities come to mind - from an increase in the number of food carts and creation of a covered, heated dining area to a farmer's market - that could increase pedestrian traffic and discourage vagrancy.
It traces their emergence from the beginnings of English vagrancy legislation in the late-mediaeval period, to early attempts in the Australasian colonies to suppress inchoate criminality, and then to 20th century efforts to tackle organised criminal activities.
Programmes which "promote" prostitution, vagrancy or gambling also face the boot.
It promotes efforts aiming at tackling the phenomenon of begging and vagrancy.
A group of scholars mostly from the US consider the historical contexts, debates, policy and legal responses, and sociological characteristics related to age of consent, antisocial personality disorders, child abuse, civil disobedience, corporate crime, date rape, euthanasia and assisted suicide, gambling, guns, hate crimes, intellectual property and Internet crimes, prescription drug abuse, prostitution, religious convictions, state and war crimes, terrorism and extremism, undocumented immigrants, and vagrancy and the homeless.