vagrant


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Related to vagrant: docker

va·grant

 (vā′grənt)
n.
1.
a. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
b. Archaic A wanderer; a rover.
2. One who lives on the streets or constitutes a public nuisance.
3. An animal occurring beyond its normal range; an accidental.
adj.
1. Wandering from place to place and lacking any means of support.
2. Living on the streets or constituting a public nuisance.
3. Inconstant or capricious; wayward: "She was resolved to win my vagrant fancy" (Frank Harris).
4. Moving in a random fashion; having no fixed direction or pattern: vagrant ice floes; a vagrant aroma.
5. Being beyond its normal range; accidental. Used of animals.

[Middle English vagraunt, probably alteration of Old French wacrant, present participle of wacrer, to wander, of Germanic origin.]

va′grant·ly adv.

vagrant

(ˈveɪɡrənt)
n
1. a person of no settled abode, income, or job; tramp
2. (Zoology) a migratory animal that is off course
adj
3. wandering about; nomadic
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of a vagrant or vagabond
5. moving in an erratic fashion, without aim or purpose; wayward
6. (Botany) (of plants) showing uncontrolled or straggling growth
Archaic equivalent: vagrom
[C15: probably from Old French waucrant (from wancrer to roam, of Germanic origin), but also influenced by Old French vagant vagabond, from Latin vagārī to wander]
ˈvagrantly adv
ˈvagrantness n

va•grant

(ˈveɪ grənt)

n.
1. a person who wanders about idly and has no permanent home or employment; vagabond.
2. Law. an idle person without visible means of support, as a tramp or beggar.
3. a person who wanders from place to place; wanderer; rover.
adj.
4. wandering or roaming from place to place.
5. of or characteristic of a vagrant.
6. wandering idly without a permanent home or employment: vagrant beggars.
7. (of plants) straggling in growth.
8. not fixed or settled, esp. in course: a vagrant leaf blown by the wind.
[1400–50; late Middle English vagaraunt, appar. present participle of Anglo-French *vagrer, perhaps < Middle English *vagren, b. vagen (< Latin vagārī to wander) and *walcren (> Old French wa(u)crer), frequentative derivative of walk]
va′grant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of supportvagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
beachcomber - a vagrant living on a beach
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
sundowner - a tramp who habitually arrives at sundown
hobo, tramp, bum - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
bird of passage, roamer, rover, wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
Adj.1.vagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to anothervagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another; "a drifting double-dealer"; "the floating population"; "vagrant hippies of the sixties"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

vagrant

noun
1. tramp, bum (informal), drifter, vagabond, rolling stone, wanderer, beggar, derelict, itinerant, down-and-out, hobo (U.S.), bag lady (chiefly U.S.), dosser (Brit. slang), person of no fixed address He lived on the street as a vagrant.
adjective

vagrant

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations
مُتَشَرِّد
-čkatulák
vagabond
flækingur
valkatavimas
bezpajumtnieksklaidonis

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt]
A. Nvagabundo/a m/f
B. ADJvagabundo, vagante (fig) → errante

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt] nvagabond(e) m/f

vagrant

nLandstreicher(in) m(f); (in town) → Stadtstreicher(in) m(f)
adj personumherziehend; lifeunstet, nomadenhaft

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrnt] nvagabondo/a, barbone/a

vagrant

(ˈveigrənt) noun
a person who has no fixed home; a tramp.
ˈvagrancy noun
the state of being a vagrant. Vagrancy is a crime in some countries.

vagrant

a. errante; suelto-a; libre.
References in classic literature ?
Vagrant Indians, of various tribes, loitered about the streets.
Passepartout had been a sort of vagrant in his early years, and now yearned for repose; but so far he had failed to find it, though he had already served in ten English houses.
One told how he had taken a life, another had taken two, a third had set a house on fire, while another had simply been a vagrant and had done nothing.
However--to be exact--there is one place where the serenity lapses for a while; this is while one is crossing the Schnurrtobel Bridge, a frail structure which swings its gossamer frame down through the dizzy air, over a gorge, like a vagrant spider-strand.
Unable to give any account of himself he was arrested as a vagrant and sentenced to imprisonment in the Infants' Sheltering Home--where he was washed.
When Captain Sleet in person stood his mast-head in this crow's nest of his, he tells us that he always had a rifle with him (also fixed in the rack), together with a powder flask and shot, for the purpose of popping off the stray narwhales, or vagrant sea unicorns infesting those waters; for you cannot successfully shoot at them from the deck owing to the resistance of the water, but to shoot down upon them is a very different thing.
Presently a vagrant poodle dog came idling along, sad at heart, lazy with the summer softness and the quiet, weary of captivity, sigh- ing for change.
His fellow-travellers at first did not know him, but supposed it to be some vagrant Root Digger sneaking into the camp; but when they recognized in this forlorn object their prime wag, She-wee-she, whom they had seen depart in the morning in such high glee and high feather, they could not contain their merriment, but hailed him with loud and repeated peals of laughter.
One fellow would demand a dollar an hour for the use of his donkey; another claimed half a dollar for pricking him up, another a quarter for helping in that service, and about fourteen guides presented bills for showing us the way through the town and its environs; and every vagrant of them was more vociferous, and more vehement and more frantic in gesture than his neighbor.
As he came closer to Sheeta he became aware that the panther on his part was stalking game of his own, and even as he realized this fact there came to his nostrils, wafted from his right by a vagrant breeze, the strong odour of a company of great apes.
But when one of the vagrant impulses of fear, common in that age of perpetual insecurity, moved within me, I was struck with my own loneliness.
She smiled to herself at vagrant impulses which arose from nowhere and suggested that she rumple his hair; while he desired greatly, when they tired of reading, to rest his head in her lap and dream with closed eyes about the future that was to be theirs.