vagrant


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va·grant

 (vā′grənt)
n.
1.
a. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
b. Archaic A wanderer; a rover.
2. One who lives on the streets or constitutes a public nuisance.
3. An animal occurring beyond its normal range; an accidental.
adj.
1. Wandering from place to place and lacking any means of support.
2. Living on the streets or constituting a public nuisance.
3. Inconstant or capricious; wayward: "She was resolved to win my vagrant fancy" (Frank Harris).
4. Moving in a random fashion; having no fixed direction or pattern: vagrant ice floes; a vagrant aroma.
5. Being beyond its normal range; accidental. Used of animals.

[Middle English vagraunt, probably alteration of Old French wacrant, present participle of wacrer, to wander, of Germanic origin.]

va′grant·ly adv.

vagrant

(ˈveɪɡrənt)
n
1. a person of no settled abode, income, or job; tramp
2. (Zoology) a migratory animal that is off course
adj
3. wandering about; nomadic
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of a vagrant or vagabond
5. moving in an erratic fashion, without aim or purpose; wayward
6. (Botany) (of plants) showing uncontrolled or straggling growth
Archaic equivalent: vagrom
[C15: probably from Old French waucrant (from wancrer to roam, of Germanic origin), but also influenced by Old French vagant vagabond, from Latin vagārī to wander]
ˈvagrantly adv
ˈvagrantness n

va•grant

(ˈveɪ grənt)

n.
1. a person who wanders about idly and has no permanent home or employment; vagabond.
2. Law. an idle person without visible means of support, as a tramp or beggar.
3. a person who wanders from place to place; wanderer; rover.
adj.
4. wandering or roaming from place to place.
5. of or characteristic of a vagrant.
6. wandering idly without a permanent home or employment: vagrant beggars.
7. (of plants) straggling in growth.
8. not fixed or settled, esp. in course: a vagrant leaf blown by the wind.
[1400–50; late Middle English vagaraunt, appar. present participle of Anglo-French *vagrer, perhaps < Middle English *vagren, b. vagen (< Latin vagārī to wander) and *walcren (> Old French wa(u)crer), frequentative derivative of walk]
va′grant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of supportvagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
beachcomber - a vagrant living on a beach
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
sundowner - a tramp who habitually arrives at sundown
hobo, tramp, bum - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
bird of passage, roamer, rover, wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
Adj.1.vagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to anothervagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another; "a drifting double-dealer"; "the floating population"; "vagrant hippies of the sixties"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

vagrant

noun
1. tramp, bum (informal), drifter, vagabond, rolling stone, wanderer, beggar, derelict, itinerant, down-and-out, hobo (U.S.), bag lady (chiefly U.S.), dosser (Brit. slang), person of no fixed address He lived on the street as a vagrant.
adjective

vagrant

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations
مُتَشَرِّد
-čkatulák
vagabond
flækingur
valkatavimas
bezpajumtnieksklaidonis

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt]
A. Nvagabundo/a m/f
B. ADJvagabundo, vagante (fig) → errante

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt] nvagabond(e) m/f

vagrant

nLandstreicher(in) m(f); (in town) → Stadtstreicher(in) m(f)
adj personumherziehend; lifeunstet, nomadenhaft

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrnt] nvagabondo/a, barbone/a

vagrant

(ˈveigrənt) noun
a person who has no fixed home; a tramp.
ˈvagrancy noun
the state of being a vagrant. Vagrancy is a crime in some countries.

vagrant

a. errante; suelto-a; libre.
References in classic literature ?
The black, rich soil had fed itself with the decay of a long period of time; such as fallen leaves, the petals of flowers, and the stalks and seed--vessels of vagrant and lawless plants, more useful after their death than ever while flaunting in the sun.
It might be that an Antinomian, a Quaker, or other heterodox religionist, was to be scourged out of the town, or an idle or vagrant Indian, whom the white man's firewater had made riotous about the streets, was to be driven with stripes into the shadow of the forest.
When Captain Sleet in person stood his mast-head in this crow's nest of his, he tells us that he always had a rifle with him (also fixed in the rack), together with a powder flask and shot, for the purpose of popping off the stray narwhales, or vagrant sea unicorns infesting those waters; for you cannot successfully shoot at them from the deck owing to the resistance of the water, but to shoot down upon them is a very different thing.
He who sits still in a house all the time may be the greatest vagrant of all; but the saunterer, in the good sense, is no more vagrant than the meandering river, which is all the while sedulously seeking the shortest course to the sea.
However--to be exact--there is one place where the serenity lapses for a while; this is while one is crossing the Schnurrtobel Bridge, a frail structure which swings its gossamer frame down through the dizzy air, over a gorge, like a vagrant spider-strand.
Presently a vagrant poodle dog came idling along, sad at heart, lazy with the summer softness and the quiet, weary of captivity, sigh- ing for change.
I'll give you a piece of bread," she said, after a pause; "but we can't take in a vagrant to lodge.
Not to lengthen these particulars, I need only add, that she made a handsome provision for all my possible wants during my month of trial; that Steerforth, to my great disappointment and hers too, did not make his appearance before she went away; that I saw her safely seated in the Dover coach, exulting in the coming discomfiture of the vagrant donkeys, with Janet at her side; and that when the coach was gone, I turned my face to the Adelphi, pondering on the old days when I used to roam about its subterranean arches, and on the happy changes which had brought me to the surface.
The Prior of Jorvaulx crossed himself and repeated a pater noster, in which all devoutly joined, excepting the Jew, the Mahomedans, and the Templar; the latter of whom, without vailing his bonnet, or testifying any reverence for the alleged sanctity of the relic, took from his neck a gold chain, which he flung on the board, saying ``Let Prior Aymer hold my pledge and that of this nameless vagrant, in token that when the Knight of Ivanhoe comes within the four seas of Britain, he underlies the challenge of Brian de Bois-Guilbert, which, if he answer not, I will proclaim him as a coward on the walls of every Temple Court in Europe.
While he waited among the branches and foliage of a near-by tree he searched the village constantly with his keen eyes, and twice he circled it, sniffing the vagrant breezes which puffed erratically from first one point of the compass and then another.
Passepartout had been a sort of vagrant in his early years, and now yearned for repose; but so far he had failed to find it, though he had already served in ten English houses.
His fellow-travellers at first did not know him, but supposed it to be some vagrant Root Digger sneaking into the camp; but when they recognized in this forlorn object their prime wag, She-wee-she, whom they had seen depart in the morning in such high glee and high feather, they could not contain their merriment, but hailed him with loud and repeated peals of laughter.