vagrant

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va·grant

 (vā′grənt)
n.
1.
a. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
b. Archaic A wanderer; a rover.
2. One who lives on the streets or constitutes a public nuisance.
3. An animal occurring beyond its normal range; an accidental.
adj.
1. Wandering from place to place and lacking any means of support.
2. Living on the streets or constituting a public nuisance.
3. Inconstant or capricious; wayward: "She was resolved to win my vagrant fancy" (Frank Harris).
4. Moving in a random fashion; having no fixed direction or pattern: vagrant ice floes; a vagrant aroma.
5. Being beyond its normal range; accidental. Used of animals.

[Middle English vagraunt, probably alteration of Old French wacrant, present participle of wacrer, to wander, of Germanic origin.]

va′grant·ly adv.

vagrant

(ˈveɪɡrənt)
n
1. a person of no settled abode, income, or job; tramp
2. (Zoology) a migratory animal that is off course
adj
3. wandering about; nomadic
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of a vagrant or vagabond
5. moving in an erratic fashion, without aim or purpose; wayward
6. (Botany) (of plants) showing uncontrolled or straggling growth
Archaic equivalent: vagrom
[C15: probably from Old French waucrant (from wancrer to roam, of Germanic origin), but also influenced by Old French vagant vagabond, from Latin vagārī to wander]
ˈvagrantly adv
ˈvagrantness n

va•grant

(ˈveɪ grənt)

n.
1. a person who wanders about idly and has no permanent home or employment; vagabond.
2. Law. an idle person without visible means of support, as a tramp or beggar.
3. a person who wanders from place to place; wanderer; rover.
adj.
4. wandering or roaming from place to place.
5. of or characteristic of a vagrant.
6. wandering idly without a permanent home or employment: vagrant beggars.
7. (of plants) straggling in growth.
8. not fixed or settled, esp. in course: a vagrant leaf blown by the wind.
[1400–50; late Middle English vagaraunt, appar. present participle of Anglo-French *vagrer, perhaps < Middle English *vagren, b. vagen (< Latin vagārī to wander) and *walcren (> Old French wa(u)crer), frequentative derivative of walk]
va′grant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of supportvagrant - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
beachcomber - a vagrant living on a beach
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
sundowner - a tramp who habitually arrives at sundown
hobo, tramp, bum - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
bird of passage, roamer, rover, wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
Adj.1.vagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to anothervagrant - continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another; "a drifting double-dealer"; "the floating population"; "vagrant hippies of the sixties"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

vagrant

noun
1. tramp, bum (informal), drifter, vagabond, rolling stone, wanderer, beggar, derelict, itinerant, down-and-out, hobo (U.S.), bag lady (chiefly U.S.), dosser (Brit. slang), person of no fixed address He lived on the street as a vagrant.
adjective

vagrant

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations
مُتَشَرِّد
-čkatulák
vagabond
flækingur
valkatavimas
bezpajumtnieksklaidonis

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt]
A. Nvagabundo/a m/f
B. ADJvagabundo, vagante (fig) → errante

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrənt] nvagabond(e) m/f

vagrant

nLandstreicher(in) m(f); (in town) → Stadtstreicher(in) m(f)
adj personumherziehend; lifeunstet, nomadenhaft

vagrant

[ˈveɪgrnt] nvagabondo/a, barbone/a

vagrant

(ˈveigrənt) noun
a person who has no fixed home; a tramp.
ˈvagrancy noun
the state of being a vagrant. Vagrancy is a crime in some countries.

vagrant

a. errante; suelto-a; libre.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Symphonic Sketches are really like a small symphony, divided into four brief tone poems: "Jubilee," a bombastically festive piece; "Noel," a slow, tranquil movement; "Hobgoblin," the most creative composition on the disc and very reminiscent of Mendelssohn again or Mussorgsky; and "A Vagrom Ballad" (vagrant's song), a kind of impressionistic, tongue-in-cheek affair.
His Sketches include "A Vagrom Ballad," which is based on hobo themes.