Vaisya


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Related to Vaisya: shudra, Vedas

Vais·ya

 (vī′shə, vīsh′yə)
n.
A member of the second-lowest of the four major castes of traditional Indian society, comprising farmers, herders, merchants, and businessmen.
adj.
Of or relating to the class of Vaisyas.

[Sanskrit vaiśyaḥ, settler, homesteader, from viśaḥ, house; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

Vaisya

(ˈvaɪsjə; ˈvaɪʃjə)
n
(Hinduism) the third of the four main Hindu castes, the traders
[C18: from Sanskrit, literally: settler, from viś settlement]

Vais•ya

(ˈvaɪs yə, ˈvaɪʃ-)

n., pl. -yas.
a member of the Hindu mercantile and professional class, above the Shudras and below the Kshatriyas. Compare Brahman (def. 1).
[1785–95; < Skt vaiśya]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vaisya - a member of the mercantile and professional Hindu caste; the third of the four main castes
vaisya - the third of the four varnas: the commoners or yeoman farmers or mercantile and professional category
Hindoo, Hindu, Hindustani - a native or inhabitant of Hindustan or India
2.vaisya - the third of the four varnas: the commoners or yeoman farmers or mercantile and professional category
varna - (Hinduism) the name for the original social division of Vedic people into four groups (which are subdivided into thousands of jatis)
Vaisya - a member of the mercantile and professional Hindu caste; the third of the four main castes
References in periodicals archive ?
Vaisya agricultural investment would follow a little later making skilful use of the conquered people as their labour-force.
7) The four primary castes in order of social status were Brahmins (the priests), Kshatriya (warriors and nobility), Vaisya (farmers, traders and artisans), and Shudra (tenant farmers and servants).
As people were divided into four castes, Bahun, Chhetri, Vaisya and Sudra, each was enjoined to follow a caste specific occupation.
Fa Xian, a Chinese Buddhist monk who travelled across India in 400 CE, recorded in his travelogue that: The heads of the Vaisya [merchant] families in them establish in the cities houses for dispensing charity and medicine.
The author puts forward more such original facts and theories--as for example the numerous images of Vishnu as Trivikrama of the 11th century, which show the ascendancy of the Vaisya sect, as mentioned in the well known iconographical text Aparajitapriccha; or that the fierce icons of Yuganaddha may have been used to inspire the people to fight against foreign invaders.
Gujarati Bania (merchant) castes made their version of Vaisya culture very Jain, a cultural phenomenon with its origins in the mixed patronage of medieval dynasties.
His thighs became the Vaisya, from his feet the Sudra was produced (Griffith, 2007).
Ya en epoca del Hinduismo se establecen, de forma definitiva, las conocidas cuatro jatis, de la raiz JAN (nacer): brahman (sacerdote), ksatriya (guerrero), vaisya (comerciante, agricultor) y sudra (esclavo).
However, the occupations assigned to the various Varnas were not professions but social functions: the Brahmin was to teach the others their duty and preserve religion, the Ksatriya was to protect his subjects, the Vaisya was to cultivate the soil or do business, and the Sudra was to work for the above-mentioned classes.
Accordingly, his head made the sky, his mind created the moon, the sun came from his eyes, his navel blew air into the world, his feet made the earth, his mouth became the Brahmin caste his arms made the Rajanya caste, his thighs became the Vaisya caste and finally the feet produced the Sudra caste (x: 90).
The author is free to interpret castes as "types" rejecting the Brahmanic caste division into four categories Brahmana (priestly class), Ksatriya (warrior class), Vaisya (business and cultivators' community) and Sudra (community of servants in general).