vale


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vale 1

 (vāl)
n.
A valley, often coursed by a stream; a dale.

[Middle English, from Old French val, from Latin vallēs; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

va·le 2

 (vā′lē, wä′lā)
interj.
Used to express leave-taking or farewell.
n.
A farewell.

[Latin valē, sing. imperative of valēre, to be strong or well; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

vale

(veɪl)
n
(Physical Geography) a literary word for valley
[C13: from Old French val, from Latin vallis valley]

vale

(ˈvɑːleɪ)
sentence substitute
farewell; goodbye

vale

(veɪl)

n.
1. valley.
2. the world, or earthly life: this vale of tears.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French val < Latin vallem, acc. of vallis, vallēs valley]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vale - a long depression in the surface of the land that usually contains a rivervale - a long depression in the surface of the land that usually contains a river
dale - an open river valley (in a hilly area)
glen - a narrow secluded valley (in the mountains)
gully - deep ditch cut by running water (especially after a prolonged downpour)
holler, hollow - a small valley between mountains; "he built himself a cabin in a hollow high up in the Appalachians"
natural depression, depression - a sunken or depressed geological formation
nullah - a ravine or gully in southern Asia
ravine - a deep narrow steep-sided valley (especially one formed by running water)
rift valley - a valley with steep sides; formed by a rift in the earth's crust

vale

noun valley, dale, glen, hollow, depression, dell, dingle, strath (Scot.), cwm (Welsh), coomb a small vale sheltering under mist-shrouded hills
Translations
údolí
dal
dalur
slėnis
ieleja
vadivadisi

vale

[veɪl] N (poet) → valle m
vale of tearsvalle m de lágrimas

vale

n (liter)Tal nt; this vale of tearsdies Jammertal

vale

(veil) noun
a valley.
References in classic literature ?
I'm the Poet of White Horse Vale, sir, With liberal notions under my cap.
However, it is time for us to get from the general to the particular; so, leaving the great army of Browns, who are scattered over the whole empire on which the sun never sets, and whose general diffusion I take to be the chief cause of that empire's stability; let us at once fix our attention upon the small nest of Browns in which our hero was hatched, and which dwelt in that portion of the royal county of Berks which is called the Vale of White Horse.
The village of Marlott lay amid the north-eastern undulations of the beautiful Vale of Blakemore or Blackmoor aforesaid, and engirdled and secluded region, for the most part untrodden as yet by tourist or landscape-painter, though within a four hours' journey from London.
It is a vale whose acquaintance is best made by viewing it from the summits of the hills that surround it--except perhaps during the droughts of summer.
At this thought, I turned my face aside from the lovely sky of eve and lonely vale of Morton--I say LONELY, for in that bend of it visible to me there was no building apparent save the church and the parsonage, half-hid in trees, and, quite at the extremity, the roof of Vale Hall, where the rich Mr.
Our mansion was situated in one of the most romantic parts of the Vale of Uske.
Then was it that the innocent and fair young shepherdess roamed from vale to vale and hill to hill, with flowing locks, and no more garments than were needful modestly to cover what modesty seeks and ever sought to hide.
Florid, with white hair, the face of an old Jupiter, and the figure of an old fox-hunter, he enlivened the vale of Thyme from end to end on his big, cantering chestnut.
She's always saying that she'll be glad when her time comes, and she doesn't want to sojourn any longer in this vale of tears.
Now works its iron will, the startled sand Blinding the combatants together locked In the death-grip; while hill and vale and stream Glow with the flash and crash of arms.
I several times met with very aged men, who from this cause had never passed the confines of their native vale, some of them having never even ascended midway up the mountains in the whole course of their lives, and who, accordingly had little idea of the appearance of any other part of the island, the whole of which is not perhaps more than sixty miles in circuit.
Bottomless vales and boundless floods, And chasms, and caves, and Titian woods, With forms that no man can discover For the dews that drip all over; Mountains toppling evermore Into seas without a shore; Seas that restlessly aspire, Surging, unto skies of fire; Lakes that endlessly outspread Their lone waters - lone and dead, - Their still waters - still and chilly With the snows of the lolling lily.