vale


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vale 1

 (vāl)
n.
A valley, often coursed by a stream; a dale.

[Middle English, from Old French val, from Latin vallēs; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

va·le 2

 (vā′lē, wä′lā)
interj.
Used to express leave-taking or farewell.
n.
A farewell.

[Latin valē, sing. imperative of valēre, to be strong or well; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

vale

(veɪl)
n
(Physical Geography) a literary word for valley
[C13: from Old French val, from Latin vallis valley]

vale

(ˈvɑːleɪ)
sentence substitute
farewell; goodbye

vale

(veɪl)

n.
1. valley.
2. the world, or earthly life: this vale of tears.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French val < Latin vallem, acc. of vallis, vallēs valley]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vale - a long depression in the surface of the land that usually contains a rivervale - a long depression in the surface of the land that usually contains a river
dale - an open river valley (in a hilly area)
glen - a narrow secluded valley (in the mountains)
gully - deep ditch cut by running water (especially after a prolonged downpour)
holler, hollow - a small valley between mountains; "he built himself a cabin in a hollow high up in the Appalachians"
natural depression, depression - a sunken or depressed geological formation
nullah - a ravine or gully in southern Asia
ravine - a deep narrow steep-sided valley (especially one formed by running water)
rift valley - a valley with steep sides; formed by a rift in the earth's crust

vale

noun valley, dale, glen, hollow, depression, dell, dingle, strath (Scot.), cwm (Welsh), coomb a small vale sheltering under mist-shrouded hills
Translations
údolí
dal
dalur
slėnis
ieleja
vadivadisi

vale

[veɪl] N (poet) → valle m
vale of tearsvalle m de lágrimas

vale

n (liter)Tal nt; this vale of tearsdies Jammertal

vale

(veil) noun
a valley.
References in classic literature ?
It always happens so in this vale of tears, there is an inevitability about such things which we can only wonder at, deplore, and bear as we best can.
They felt it might be a being partially benighted in the vale of ignorance, but it could not be one who would willingly devote his rich natural gifts to the purposes of wanton treachery.
So in this vale of Death, God girds us round; and over all our gloom, the sun of Righteousness still shines a beacon and a hope.
And nuns came, also; and more again, and yet more; and built over against the mon- astery on the yon side of the vale, and added building to building, until mighty was that nunnery.
Friends all, my poor brother that lays yonder has done generous by them that's left behind in the vale of sorrers.
From my seat I could look down on Thornfield: the grey and battlemented hall was the principal object in the vale below me; its woods and dark rookery rose against the west.
Forthwith upright he rears from off the Pool His mighty Stature; on each hand the flames Drivn backward slope their pointing spires, & rowld In billows, leave i'th' midst a horrid Vale.
This I presently discovered, for, going as soon as I was dressed to pay my attendance upon his honour, he asked me "the meaning of what his servant had reported, that I was not the same thing when I slept, as I appeared to be at other times; that his vale assured him, some part of me was white, some yellow, at least not so white, and some brown.
In Alphonso's Clericalis Disciplina a serpent was mentioned with eyes of real jacinth, and in the romantic history of Alexander, the Conqueror of Emathia was said to have found in the vale of Jordan snakes "with collars of real emeralds growing on their backs.
Then was it that the innocent and fair young shepherdess roamed from vale to vale and hill to hill, with flowing locks, and no more garments than were needful modestly to cover what modesty seeks and ever sought to hide.
Picking her up in his strong arms, he bore her swiftly to the side of one of the many brooks which watered the vale.
Florid, with white hair, the face of an old Jupiter, and the figure of an old fox-hunter, he enlivened the vale of Thyme from end to end on his big, cantering chestnut.