valiant


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val·iant

 (văl′yənt)
adj.
Possessing or exhibiting valor; brave: a valiant knight; a valiant effort. See Synonyms at brave.

[Middle English, from Old French vaillant, from Latin valēns, valent-, present participle of valēre, to be strong; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

val′ian·cy, val′iance, val′iant·ness n.
val′iant·ly adv.

valiant

(ˈvæljənt)
adj
1. courageous, intrepid, or stout-hearted; brave
2. marked by bravery or courage: a valiant deed.
[C14: from Old French vaillant, from valoir to be of value, from Latin valēre to be strong]
ˈvaliance, ˈvaliancy n
ˈvaliantly adv

val•iant

(ˈvæl yənt)

adj.
1. boldly courageous; brave; stout-hearted.
2. marked by or showing bravery or valor; heroic: a valiant effort.
[1275–1325; Middle English valia(u)nt < Anglo-French; Middle French vaillant, present participle of valoir to be of worth < Latin valēre; see -ant]
val′ian•cy (-yən si) val′iance, n.
val′iant•ly, adv.
syn: See brave.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.valiant - having or showing valorvaliant - having or showing valor; "a valiant attempt to prevent the hijack"; "a valiant soldier"
brave, courageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"

valiant

valiant

adjective
Translations
شُجاع، باسِل
statečný
tapper
bátorhősiesmerészvitéz
hugrakkur, hetjulegur
drosmīgsdrošsirdīgs

valiant

[ˈvælɪənt] ADJ (poet) [person] → valiente, valeroso; [effort] → valeroso

valiant

[ˈvæliənt] adj [effort, attempt] → vaillant(e) before n

valiant

adj
(liter) soldier, deedtapfer, kühn (geh)
he made a valiant effort to save herer unternahm einen kühnen Versuch, sie zu retten; she made a valiant effort to smilesie versuchte tapfer zu lächeln; never mind, it was a valiant attemptmachen Sie sich nichts draus, es war ein löblicher Versuch

valiant

[ˈvæljənt] adj (liter) → coraggioso/a, valoroso/a
a valiant knight → un prode cavaliere

valiant

(ˈvӕliənt) adjective
(of a person, his actions etc) brave, courageous or heroic. valiant deeds; He was valiant in battle.
ˈvaliantly adverb

valiant

a. valiente.
References in classic literature ?
Mercenaries and auxiliaries are useless and dangerous; and if one holds his state based on these arms, he will stand neither firm nor safe; for they are disunited, ambitious, and without discipline, unfaithful, valiant before friends, cowardly before enemies; they have neither the fear of God nor fidelity to men, and destruction is deferred only so long as the attack is; for in peace one is robbed by them, and in war by the enemy.
And in the beginning of their expansion on land, through not having much territory, and because of their great reputation, they had not much to fear from their captains; but when they expanded, as under Carmignuola,[#] they had a taste of this mistake; for, having found him a most valiant man (they beat the Duke of Milan under his leadership), and, on the other hand, knowing how lukewarm he was in the war, they feared they would no longer conquer under him, and for this reason they were not willing, nor were they able, to let him go; and so, not to lose again that which they had acquired, they were compelled, in order to secure themselves, to murder him.
Rikki, the valiant, the true, Tikki, with eyeballs of flame, Rikk-tikki-tikki, the ivory-fanged, the hunter with eyeballs of flame!
The Valiant Soldier is pretty well known hereabouts.
Where have you come from, if you don't know the Valiant Soldier as well as the church catechism?
My oath on it," said Andres, "your worship will be well advised to obey the command of that good knight- may he live a thousand years- for, as he is a valiant and just judge, by Roque, if you do not pay me, he will come back and do as he said.
Andres went off rather down in the mouth, swearing he would go to look for the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha and tell him exactly what had happened, and that all would have to be repaid him sevenfold; but for all that, he went off weeping, while his master stood laughing.
Thus did the valiant Don Quixote right that wrong, and, thoroughly satisfied with what had taken place, as he considered he had made a very happy and noble beginning with his knighthood, he took the road towards his village in perfect self-content, saying in a low voice, "Well mayest thou this day call thyself fortunate above all on earth, O Dulcinea del Toboso, fairest of the fair
Or as some fierce lion upon the mountains in the pride of his strength fastens on the finest heifer in a herd as it is feeding--first he breaks her neck with his strong jaws, and then gorges on her blood and entrails; dogs and shepherds raise a hue and cry against him, but they stand aloof and will not come close to him, for they are pale with fear--even so no one had the courage to face valiant Menelaus.
Aeneas speared Leiocritus son of Arisbas, a valiant follower of Lycomedes, and Lycomedes was moved with pity as he saw him fall; he therefore went close up, and speared Apisaon son of Hippasus shepherd of his people in the liver under the midriff, so that he died; he had come from fertile Paeonia and was the best man of them all after Asteropaeus.
All the best of them were being worn out by the great weight of their armour, but the two valiant heroes, Thrasymedes and Antilochus, had not yet heard of the death of Patroclus, and believed him to be still alive and leading the van against the Trojans; they were keeping themselves in reserve against the death or rout of their own comrades, for so Nestor had ordered when he sent them from the ships into battle.
Automedon, valiant son of Diores, lashed them again and again; many a time did he speak kindly to them, and many a time did he upbraid them, but they would neither go back to the ships by the waters of the broad Hellespont, nor yet into battle among the Achaeans; they stood with their chariot stock still, as a pillar set over the tomb of some dead man or woman, and bowed their heads to the ground.