valued


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val·ue

 (văl′yo͞o)
n.
1. An amount, as of goods, services, or money, considered to be a fair and suitable equivalent for something else; a fair price or return.
2. Monetary or material worth: the fluctuating value of gold and silver.
3. Worth in usefulness or importance to the possessor; utility or merit: the value of an education.
4. often values A principle or standard, as of behavior, that is considered important or desirable: "The speech was a summons back to the patrician values of restraint and responsibility" (Jonathan Alter).
5. Precise meaning or import, as of a word.
6. Mathematics A quantity or number expressed by an algebraic term.
7. Music The relative duration of a tone or rest.
8. The relative darkness or lightness of a color. See Table at color.
9. Linguistics The sound quality of a letter or diphthong.
10. One of a series of specified values: issued a stamp of new value.
tr.v. val·ued, val·u·ing, val·ues
1. To determine or estimate the worth or value of; appraise.
2. To regard highly; esteem: I value your advice. See Synonyms at appreciate.
3. To rate according to relative estimate of worth or desirability; evaluate: valued health above money.
4. To assign a value to (a unit of currency, for example).
adj.
1. Of or relating to the practice of investing in individual securities that, according to some fundamental measure, such as book value, appear to be relatively less expensive than comparable securities.
2. Relating to or consisting of principles or standards: a value system.

[Middle English, from Old French, from feminine past participle of valoir, to be strong, be worth, from Latin valēre; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

val′u·er n.

valued

(ˈvæljuːd)
adj
1. held in high regard, esp in respect of merit
2. considered of great value, and therefore given a high price
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.valued - (usually used in combination) having value of a specified kind; "triple-valued"
combining form - a bound form used only in compounds; "`hemato-' is a combining form in words like `hematology'"
quantitative - expressible as a quantity or relating to or susceptible of measurement; "export wheat without quantitative limitations"; "quantitative analysis determines the amounts and proportions of the chemical constituents of a substance or mixture"
2.valued - held in great esteem for admirable qualities especially of an intrinsic nature; "a valued friend"; "precious memories"
worthy - having worth or merit or value; being honorable or admirable; "a worthy fellow"; "a worthy cause"

valued

adjective appreciated, prized, esteemed, highly regarded, loved, dear, treasured, cherished a valued member of the team
Translations
مُقَيَّم، مُقَدَّر
drahocenný
værdsat
mikilsmetinn, dÿrmætur
değerlikıymetli

valued

[ˈvæljuːd] ADJ [friend, customer] → estimado, apreciado; [contribution] → valioso

valued

[ˈvæljuːd] adj
(= appreciated) [customer, colleague, friend] → estimé(e)
(= prized) [commodity, thing] → prisé(e)
Why were spices so highly valued in late 15th-century Europe? → Pourquoi les épices étaient-elles si prisées en Europe à la fin du XVe siècle?value judgment value judgement (British) njugement m de valeur

valued

adj friend(hoch) geschätzt, lieb; employee(hoch) geschätzt; contributiongeschätzt; he is a valued colleagueer ist als Kollege hoch geschätzt; as a valued customerals (ein) geschätzter Kunde; to be valued for somethingfür etw geschätzt werden

valued

[ˈvæljuːd] adj (appreciated) → stimato/a, apprezzato/a, tenuto/a in grande considerazione

value

(ˈvӕljuː) noun
1. worth, importance or usefulness. His special knowledge was of great value during the war; She sets little value on wealth.
2. price. What is the value of that stamp?
3. purchasing power. Are those coins of any value?
4. fairness of exchange (for one's money etc). You get good value for money at this supermarket!
5. the length of a musical note.
verb
1. to suggest a suitable price for. This painting has been valued at $50,000.
2. to regard as good or important. He values your advice very highly.
ˈvaluable adjective
having high value. a valuable painting.
ˈvaluables noun plural
things of special value. She keeps her jewellery and other valuables in a locked drawer.
ˈvalued adjective
regarded as valuable or precious. What is your most valued possession?
ˈvalueless adjective
having no value; worthless. The necklace is completely valueless.
ˈvalues noun plural
standards or principles. People have very different moral values.
value-ˈadded tax noun
(abbreviation VAT) a tax that is imposed on goods and services.
References in classic literature ?
for she had thought that no one saw and appreciated her efforts to be good, and this assurance was doubly precious, doubly encouraging, because unexpected and from the person whose commendation she most valued.
He thought it very discouraging that his wife, who was the sole object of his existence, evinced so little interest in things which concerned him, and valued so little his conversation.
Adjusting his rifle, he was about to make an exhibition of that skill on which he so much valued himself, when the warrior struck up the piece with his hand, saying:
Much as Christie admired and valued her sister's charms, she thought this was really going too far.
He succeeded, accordingly, in holding an imperfect sort of intercourse, at one remove, with the departed personages in whose custody the so much valued secret had been carried beyond the precincts of earth.
The merchants valued him not less than we, his esoteric friends.
So am I, my boy; but he has to thank you more than me; we must now be looking out for a quiet, genteel place for him, where he will be valued.
Jukniene-- she valued them differently, for she had a feeling that she was getting something for nothing by means of them--that with them she was getting the better of a world that was getting the better of her in so many other ways.
Henrique, who valued himself on his gentlemanly adroitness in all matters of gallantry, soon had his fair cousin in the saddle, and, gathering the reins, placed them in her hands.
They were as dogs, wild beasts, lepers, and no soul that valued its hope of eternal life would throw it away by meddling in any sort with these rebuked and smitten outcasts.
No poet who valued his reputation would touch such a theme as that.
This new interest was a valued novelty in whistling, which he had just acquired from a negro, and he was suffering to practise it un- disturbed.