values


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Related to values: family values

val·ue

 (văl′yo͞o)
n.
1. An amount, as of goods, services, or money, considered to be a fair and suitable equivalent for something else; a fair price or return.
2. Monetary or material worth: the fluctuating value of gold and silver.
3. Worth in usefulness or importance to the possessor; utility or merit: the value of an education.
4. often values A principle or standard, as of behavior, that is considered important or desirable: "The speech was a summons back to the patrician values of restraint and responsibility" (Jonathan Alter).
5. Precise meaning or import, as of a word.
6. Mathematics A quantity or number expressed by an algebraic term.
7. Music The relative duration of a tone or rest.
8. The relative darkness or lightness of a color. See Table at color.
9. Linguistics The sound quality of a letter or diphthong.
10. One of a series of specified values: issued a stamp of new value.
tr.v. val·ued, val·u·ing, val·ues
1. To determine or estimate the worth or value of; appraise.
2. To regard highly; esteem: I value your advice. See Synonyms at appreciate.
3. To rate according to relative estimate of worth or desirability; evaluate: valued health above money.
4. To assign a value to (a unit of currency, for example).
adj.
1. Of or relating to the practice of investing in individual securities that, according to some fundamental measure, such as book value, appear to be relatively less expensive than comparable securities.
2. Relating to or consisting of principles or standards: a value system.

[Middle English, from Old French, from feminine past participle of valoir, to be strong, be worth, from Latin valēre; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

val′u·er n.

Values

See also ethics; philosophy

Philosophy. the study of values, as those of aesthetics, ethics, or religion. — axiologist, n.axiological, adj.
the categorizing of something as valueless trivia.
the theory or doctrine of values.

values

(in painting) The degree of lightness or darkness in a color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.values - beliefs of a person or social group in which they have an emotional investment (either for or against something)values - beliefs of a person or social group in which they have an emotional investment (either for or against something); "he has very conservatives values"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
Translations
قِيَم
zásady
værdier
értékrend
gildi
değer yargılarıdeğerler

value

(ˈvӕljuː) noun
1. worth, importance or usefulness. His special knowledge was of great value during the war; She sets little value on wealth.
2. price. What is the value of that stamp?
3. purchasing power. Are those coins of any value?
4. fairness of exchange (for one's money etc). You get good value for money at this supermarket!
5. the length of a musical note.
verb
1. to suggest a suitable price for. This painting has been valued at $50,000.
2. to regard as good or important. He values your advice very highly.
ˈvaluable adjective
having high value. a valuable painting.
ˈvaluables noun plural
things of special value. She keeps her jewellery and other valuables in a locked drawer.
ˈvalued adjective
regarded as valuable or precious. What is your most valued possession?
ˈvalueless adjective
having no value; worthless. The necklace is completely valueless.
ˈvalues noun plural
standards or principles. People have very different moral values.
value-ˈadded tax noun
(abbreviation VAT) a tax that is imposed on goods and services.
References in classic literature ?
In general the doctrine of the Superman can only be understood correctly in conjunction with other ideas of the author's, such as:--the Order of Rank, the Will to Power, and the Transvaluation of all Values.
These qualities, it is true, are those pre-eminently of the "Works and Days": the literary values of the "Theogony" are of a more technical character, skill in ordering and disposing long lists of names, sure judgment in seasoning a monotonous subject with marvellous incidents or episodes, and no mean imagination in depicting the awful, as is shown in the description of Tartarus (ll.
He chooses to depict people from humble life, because, being nearer to nature than others, they are on the whole more impassioned, certainly [102] more direct in their expression of passion, than other men; it is for this direct expression of passion that he values their humble words.
We have three times the railways, banks, libraries, newspapers, exports, farm values, and national wealth.
Astor, passed into the possession of the Northwest Company at about a third of their value.
All my jewels and articles of value, then, are packed up?
The debts amounted to double the value of the property.
But you, who make a mock of human life, don't you place any value upon it whatever?
We see the value set on animals even by the barbarians of Tierra del Fuego, by their killing and devouring their old women, in times of dearth, as of less value than their dogs.
Neither the value of lands, nor the numbers of the people, which have been successively proposed as the rule of State contributions, has any pretension to being a just representative.
The vessels they make use of are black earthenware, which, the older it is, they set a greater value on.
For which reason the art of money-getting seems to be chiefly conversant about trade, and the business of it to be able to tell where the greatest profits can be made, being the means of procuring abundance of wealth and possessions: and thus wealth is very often supposed to consist in the quantity of money which any one possesses, as this is the medium by which all trade is conducted and a fortune made, others again regard it as of no value, as being of none by nature, but arbitrarily made so by compact; so that if those who use it should alter their sentiments, it would be worth nothing, as being of no service for any necessary purpose.