vampire


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vam·pire

 (văm′pīr′)
n.
1. In popular folklore, an undead being in human form that survives by sucking the blood of living people, especially at night.
2. A person, such as an extortionist, who takes advantage of others, especially for personal gain.
3. A vampire bat.

[French, from German Vampir, of Slavic origin.]

vam·pir′ic (văm-pĭr′ĭk), vam·pir′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl), vam′pir′ish (-ĭsh) adj.

vampire

(ˈvæmpaɪə)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in European folklore) a corpse that rises nightly from its grave to drink the blood of the living
2. (Animals) See vampire bat
3. a person who preys mercilessly upon others, such as a blackmailer
4. See vamp11
5. (Theatre) theatre a trapdoor on a stage
[C18: from French, from German Vampir, from Magyar; perhaps related to Turkish uber witch, Russian upyr vampire]
vampiric, ˈvampirish adj

vam•pire

(ˈvæm paɪər)

n.
1.
a. (in E European folklore) a corpse, animated by an undeparted soul or a demon, that periodically leaves the grave and disturbs the living.
b. any of various popular or literary representations of the folkloric vampire, typically a being that sucks the blood of sleeping persons at night.
2. a person who preys ruthlessly upon others.
3. a woman who seduces and exploits men.
[1725–35; (< French) < German Vampir < Serbo-Croatian vàmpīr]
vam•pir′ic (-ˈpɪr ɪk) vam′pir•ish, adj.

vampire

A corpse that returns to life at night to suck people’s blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the livingvampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the living
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm

vampire

noun
A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
Translations
شَبَح الميِّت الذي يجول لإمتصاص الدِّماءمَصَّاصُ الدِّمَاء
upír
vampyr
vampiir
vampyyriverenimijä
vampir
vámpírdenevér
vampíravampíra, blóîsuga
吸血鬼ヴァンパイア
흡혈귀
vampyras
vampīrs
vampirvampiră
upír
vampir
vampyr
ผีดูดเลือด
вампірупир
ma cà rồng

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪəʳ]
A. N
1. (Zool) → vampiro m
2. (fig) → vampiro m; (= woman) → vampiresa f
B. CPD vampire bat Nvampiro m

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪər] nvampire mvampire bat nvampire m

vampire

n (lit, fig)Vampir(in) m(f), → Blutsauger(in) m(f)

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪəʳ] nvampiro

vampire

(ˈvӕmpaiə) noun
a dead person who is imagined to rise from the grave at night and suck the blood of sleeping people.

vampire

مَصَّاصُ الدِّمَاء upír vampyr Vampir βρυκόλακας vampiro vampyyri vampire vampir vampiro 吸血鬼 흡혈귀 vampier vampyr wampir vampiro вампир vampyr ผีดูดเลือด vampir ma cà rồng 吸血鬼
References in classic literature ?
She means vampire, not seaweed, but it doesn't matter.
One of the Indians has been attacked by a big vampire bat
If you wish to please them, you must sell yourself to some rich vampire of the factories or great landlord.
I must say they were not cheering to me, for amongst them were "Ordog"--Satan, "Pokol"--hell, "stregoica"--witch, "vrolok" and "vlkoslak"--both mean the same thing, one being Slovak and the other Servian for something that is either werewolf or vampire.
Oh, pray do, for heaven's sake, tell us all about -- is he a vampire, or a resuscitated corpse, or what?
And if a struggling man staggers a bit over the line in his youth, in the lower parts of the law which are pretty dingy, anyhow, there's always some old vampire to hang on to him all his life for it.
cackled old Gagool behind us, as she flitted about like a vampire bat.
In appalling masks; hideous, hairy, red-eyed Jacks in Boxes; Vampire Kites; demoniacal Tumblers who wouldn't lie down, and were perpetually flying forward, to stare infants out of countenance; his soul perfectly revelled.
demanded Ariadne, hovering over her prey like a vampire.
The Vampire bat is often the cause of much trouble, by biting the horses on their withers.
I considered the being whom I had cast among mankind, and endowed with the will and power to effect purposes of horror, such as the deed which he had now done, nearly in the light of my own vampire, my own spirit let loose from the grave, and forced to destroy all that was dear to me.
Feeling, no doubt, that simplicity and plainness are the soul of elegance, Miss Brass wore no collar or kerchief except upon her head, which was invariably ornamented with a brown gauze scarf, like the wing of the fabled vampire, and which, twisted into any form that happened to suggest itself, formed an easy and graceful head-dress.