vane


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vane

 (vān)
n.
1. A weathervane.
2. Any of several usually relatively thin, rigid, flat, or sometimes curved surfaces radially mounted along an axis, as a blade in a turbine or a sail on a windmill, that is moved by or used to move a fluid.
3. The flattened, weblike part of a feather, consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft.
4.
a. The movable target on a leveling rod.
b. A sight on a quadrant or compass.
5. One of the metal guidance or stabilizing fins attached to the tail of a bomb or other missile.

[Middle English fane, vane, from Old English fana, flag; see pan- in Indo-European roots.]

vane

(veɪn)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: weather vane or wind vane a flat plate or blade of metal mounted on a vertical axis in an exposed position to indicate wind direction
2. (Mechanical Engineering) any one of the flat blades or sails forming part of the wheel of a windmill
3. (Mechanical Engineering) any flat or shaped plate used to direct fluid flow, esp a stator blade in a turbine, etc
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a fin or plate fitted to a projectile or missile to provide stabilization or guidance
5. (Zoology) ornithol the flat part of a feather, consisting of two rows of barbs on either side of the shaft
6. (Surveying) surveying
a. a sight on a quadrant or compass
b. the movable marker on a levelling staff
[Old English fana; related to Old Saxon, Old High German fano, Old Norse fani, Latin pannus cloth]
vaned adj
ˈvaneless adj

Vane

(veɪn)
n
(Biography) Sir Henry, known as Sir Harry Vane. 1613–62, English Puritan statesman and colonial administrator; governor of Massachusetts (1636–37). He was executed for high treason after the Restoration

vane

(veɪn)

n.
2. any of a number of blades or plates attached radially to a rotating cylinder or shaft, as in a turbine or windmill, that move or are moved by a fluid, as steam or air.
3. a person who is readily changeable or fickle.
4.
a. (on a rocket) any fixed or movable surface providing directional control for atmospheric flight.
b. a similar plane surface in the exhaust jet of a reaction engine, providing directional control while the engine is firing.
5. the web of a feather.
[before 1100; Middle English; Old English fana flag, c. Old Saxon, Old High German fano, Old Norse -fani flag, cloth]

Vane

(veɪn)

n.
Sir Henry (Sir Harry Vane), 1613–62, British statesman and author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vane - mechanical device attached to an elevated structurevane - mechanical device attached to an elevated structure; rotates freely to show the direction of the wind
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
weathercock - weathervane with a vane in the form of a rooster
wind tee - weather vane shaped like a T and located at an airfield
2.vane - a fin attached to the tail of an arrow, bomb or missile in order to stabilize or guide itvane - a fin attached to the tail of an arrow, bomb or missile in order to stabilize or guide it
arrow - a projectile with a straight thin shaft and an arrowhead on one end and stabilizing vanes on the other; intended to be shot from a bow
fin - a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish
missile - a rocket carrying a warhead of conventional or nuclear explosives; may be ballistic or directed by remote control
3.vane - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or watervane - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
fan blade - blade of a rotating fan
eggbeater, helicopter, whirlybird, chopper - an aircraft without wings that obtains its lift from the rotation of overhead blades
impeller - the blade of a rotor (as in the compressor of a jet engine)
oar - an implement used to propel or steer a boat
paddle - a blade of a paddle wheel or water wheel
propeller, propellor - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
rotating mechanism - a mechanism that rotates
rudder blade - the vertical blade on a rudder
turbine - rotary engine in which the kinetic energy of a moving fluid is converted into mechanical energy by causing a bladed rotor to rotate
aerogenerator, wind generator, windmill - generator that extracts usable energy from winds
4.vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaftvane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
feather, plumage, plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
barb - one of the parallel filaments projecting from the main shaft of a feather
blade - a broad flat body part (as of the shoulder or tongue)
Translations
déflecteur de volet

vane

[veɪn] N (= weather vane) → veleta f; [of mill] → aspa f; [of propeller] → paleta f; [of feather] → barbas fpl

vane

n (also weather vane)Wetterfahne f, → Wetterhahn m; (of windmill)Flügel m; (of propeller)Flügel m, → Blatt nt (of turbine)(Leit)schaufel f

vane

[veɪn] n (also weathervane) → segnavento
References in classic literature ?
said Catherine, leaning back, and returning his look with a suddenly clouded brow: her humour was a mere vane for constantly varying caprices.
Your voice and the voice of Sibyl Vane are two things that I shall never forget.
Endicott, with the banner from which he had torn the symbol of subjection, and Winthrop, and Sir Henry Vane, and Dudley, Haynes, Bellingham, and Leverett.
She was favored by young Henry Vane, who had come over from England a year or two before, and had since been chosen governor of the colony, at the age of twenty-four.
This gracious English maiden, with her clinging robes, her amulets and girdles, with something quaint and angular in her step, her carriage something mediaeval and Gothic, in the details of her person and dress, this lovely Evelyn Vane (isn't it a beautiful name?
Bright shone the sun on battlement and tower, and in the blue air overhead a Hock of clattering jackdaws flew around the gilded weather vane and spire.
He displayed also a brass knocker, a brass plate, and a brass bell- handle, all very bright and shining; and had a mast, with a vane on the top of it, in his back yard.
The morning before we anchored at Porto Praya, I collected a little packet of this brown-coloured fine dust, which appeared to have been filtered from the wind by the gauze of the vane at the masthead.
Ensign Shafton had run away with Lady Barbara Fitzurse, the Earl of Bruin's daughter and heiress; and poor Vere Vane, a gentleman who, up to forty, had maintained a most respectable character and reared a numerous family, suddenly and outrageously left his home, for the sake of Mrs.
But destroying it would be a crime against God and Art, and may I be spitted on the vane of St.
On, on we flew, with changing lights upon the water, being now in the blessed region of fleecy skies; a bright sun lighting us by day, and a bright moon by night; the vane pointing directly homeward, alike the truthful index to the favouring wind and to our cheerful hearts; until at sunrise, one fair Monday morning - the twenty-seventh of June, I shall not easily forget the day - there lay before us, old Cape Clear, God bless it, showing, in the mist of early morning, like a cloud: the brightest and most welcome cloud, to us, that ever hid the face of Heaven's fallen sister - Home.
Henson's scheme (which at first was considered very feasible even by men of science,) was founded upon the principle of an inclined plane, started from an eminence by an extrinsic force, applied and continued by the revolution of impinging vanes, in form and number resembling the vanes of a windmill.