variola major


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Related to variola major: variola minor, Variola vera
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.variola major - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scarsvariola major - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scars
pox - a contagious disease characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pock marks
alastrim, Cuban itch, Kaffir pox, milk pox, pseudosmallpox, pseudovariola, variola minor, West Indian smallpox, white pox - a mild form of smallpox caused by a less virulent form of the virus
pock - a pustule in an eruptive disease
2.variola major - a type of smallpox virus that has a fatality rate of up to 25 percent
smallpox virus, variola virus - the virus that causes smallpox in humans; can be used as a bioweapon
References in periodicals archive ?
The report by NTI also stated North Korea was capable of indigenously producing other agents of biological warfare including Variola major (smallpox), Francisella tularensis (rabbit fever), and Bunyaviridae Hantavirus (Korean hemorrhagic fever).
Caused by the variola major virus, smallpox inflicted great pain on victims, beginning with fever, nausea and other flu-like symptoms before leading to lesions on the face and body.
What's more, she had contracted the deadliest strain, Variola major.
On the other hand, Langmuir, Usher and the CDC were surely right to emphasize the great difficulty eradication would actually entail, especially in East Bengal, and it's no an accident that the very last cases on earth of Variola major were stamped out in Bangladesh--the former East Pakistan--late in 1975.
His mother, Eleanor McMillan, was a graduate of Chatham Hospital School of Nursing and worked on the smallpox wards at Henry Ford Hospital during North America's last outbreak of variola major in Detroit and Windsor in 1924; his uncle, William McMillan, a physician, would become the ranking Liberal Member of Parliament in the 1960s.
Category A biological agents include: Variola major (smallpox), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), Yersinia pestis (plague), Clostridium botulinum (botulism), Francisella tularensis (tularemia) and filoviruses and arena viruses (such as Ebola and Lassa virus which result in viral hemorrhagic fever) (CDC 200511).
Variola major caused a serious disease that killed between 10 percent and 30 percent of its victims, whereas variola minor gave rise to a much milder illness called alastrim, with a case mortality rate of less than 1 percent.
In 1975 the last case of smallpox caused by wild variola major was in a 3-year-old Bangladeshi girl (last case in Asia) and the last case of smallpox caused by wild variola minor was in a 23-year-old Somalian in December 1977.
Parker was diagnosed as having contracted variola major, the most lethal type of the disease.
Analysis of the complete genome of smallpox variola major virus strain Bangladesh-1975.
Overall, the average death rate of all types of variola major is about 30%.
The CDC also has identified an "A" list of biological agents of highest concern, which includes (a) variola major (smallpox), (b) Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), (c) Yersinia pestis (plague), (d) Francisella tularensis (tularemia), (e) botulinum toxin (botulism), and (f) filoviruses and arenaviruses (viral hemorrhagic fevers).