variometer

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var·i·om·e·ter

 (vâr′ē-ŏm′ĭ-tər, văr′-)
n.
A variable inductor used to measure variations in terrestrial magnetism.

variometer

(ˌvɛərɪˈɒmɪtə)
n
1. (General Physics) an instrument for measuring variations in a magnetic field, used esp for studying the magnetic field of the earth
2. (Electrical Engineering) electronics a variable inductor consisting of a movable coil mounted inside and connected in series with a fixed coil
3. (Aeronautics) a sensitive rate-of-climb indicator, used mainly in gliders

var•i•om•e•ter

(ˌvɛər iˈɒm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a two-coil inductor in which electrical inductance is varied by rotating one coil within the other.
2. an adaptation of this used for detecting changes in the earth's magnetic field.
[1895–1900; vari- (see various) + -o- + -meter]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.variometer - a measuring instrument for measuring variations in a magnetic fieldvariometer - a measuring instrument for measuring variations in a magnetic field
measuring device, measuring instrument, measuring system - instrument that shows the extent or amount or quantity or degree of something
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References in periodicals archive ?
Work includes replacement of helix coils which make up part of the antenna matching network, replacing of the pure water cooling loop systems and two grid variometers which are part of the transmitter, and even power supply replacement.
The new sensor's altitude resolution of up to 20 cm makes it ideal for use in altimeters and variometers.
Since the three-component magnetic variometer can not be considered as a point-source instrument at a distance of 1 meter (three sensors located along a straight line, at a distance of 16 cm), the numeric value (module of vector) of magnetic induction in the coil with current could be calculated only approximately, based on the data from three variometers.
Because it is easy to build, amateurs can use home-made variometers for studying divergences in the local magnetic field and detecting auroral conditions--for example, the jamjar magnetometer, described in the Journal by Livesey.
In his paper 'A comparison of two simple magnetometers' which appeared in the 2012 August issue of the Journal, author Sam Dick gives the impression that a variometer is an instrument for recording changes in the direction of a magnetic compass needle.