variorum


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var·i·o·rum

 (vâr′ē-ôr′əm, văr′-)
n.
1. An edition of the works of an author with notes by various scholars or editors.
2. An edition containing various versions of a text.
adj.
Of or relating to a variorum edition or text.

[From Latin (ēditiō cum notīs) variōrum, (edition with the notes) of various persons, genitive pl. of varius, various.]

variorum

(ˌvɛərɪˈɔːrəm)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) containing notes by various scholars or critics or various versions of the text: a variorum edition.
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an edition or text of this kind
[C18: from Latin phrase ēditiō cum notīs variōrum edition with the notes of various commentators]

var•i•o•rum

(ˌvɛər iˈɔr əm, -ˈoʊr-)

adj.
1. containing different versions of a certain text.
2. containing notes and commentaries by a number of scholars.
n.
3. a variorum edition or text.
[1720–30; < Latin ēditiō cum notīs variōrum edition with the notes of various persons]

variorum

a work containing all available versions and variants of a text to enable scholars to compare them and study the development of the work. — variorum, adj.
See also: Books

Variorum

 a collection of an author’s complete works with a commentary or notes, 1728.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.variorum - an edition containing various versions of a text or notes by various scholars or editorsvariorum - an edition containing various versions of a text or notes by various scholars or editors
edition - the form in which a text (especially a printed book) is published
References in periodicals archive ?
I have earlier made it clear that I think Poems: A Variorum Edition (Volume 9) and Ronald Bosco's biographical monograph that is the Historical Introduction to Letters and Social Aims (Volume 8), are especially important additions to Emerson scholarship, so it is distressing to find that 22 of the libraries lack Volume 8, and 29 lack Volume 9.
Mukherjee was addressing a gathering at the Jadavpur University where he launched the 'Bichitra' Tagore Online Variorum, a digital collection of the works of Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore in English and Bengali.
Ten articles collected in this book under three headings are, like many other volumes in Ashgate's Variorum Collected Studies Series, a collection of earlier papers published in professional journals.
wake of the newer facsimile and variorum editions of her poems and
In the second chapter, King tells the long and complex publication history of the Acts and Monuments, from Foxe's initial Latin prototypes published on the continent to four massive versions published in England during Foxe's lifetime (these four main editions of the Acts and Monuments can now be viewed in an online variorum edition: www.
It supplements and brings up to date the critical past as recounted by Hyder Rollins in the New Variorum (1938), but does not relay Rollins's considerable doubt about Shakespeare's authorship, based on the writings of several nineteenth-and early twentieth-century critics.
So far as Yeats's plays are concerned it is non-canonical and was included in the Variorum edition in 1966, alongside Where There Is Nothing (1902-3), over which Yeats briefly considered Moore again as collaborator (see Katharine Worth's edition (1987)), in Alspach's final section betokening marginality and entitled 'Plays Not Included in the Main Text'.
Fourteen of these articles have now been reprinted in the Ashgate Variorum Series, and we are glad to have them collected in one place.
In "The Variorum Edition" Ashbery tips his hat to those of his epigones whose provisional solution has been to engage in ever more radical deconstructions of language:
For an excellent detailed survey of views on this passage, see Chaucer, A Variorum Edition of the Works, II: The Canterbury Tales, part IX, ed.
8)) Even before the rise of the New Bibliography, or the Arden, New Oxford, or Cambridge editions that assume some version of reconstruction, the variorum commented on its choice of "Vienna": "COLLIER: The Guiana of Q1 perhaps arose from the shorthand-writer having misheard the name.