varved


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varved

(vɑːvd)
adj
(Physical Geography) having layers of sedimentary deposit
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Many naturally-occurring soils, such as flocculated clays, varved silts or sands, are typically deposited via sedimentation over long periods.
Kuksa mine clay (dark brown, greasy, varved limnoglacial (lgIIIgr), with bright light sandy inter-layers) mine was selected for a detailed investigation (Tables 1 and 2) (Petrikaitis 2007).
High-frequency paleoclimate signals from Foulden Maar, Waipiata Volcanic Field, Southern New Zealand: an Early Miocene varved lacustrine diatomite deposit Sedimentary Geology 222:98-110.
Lake Timiskaming (100 km long, 200 m maximum depth) is the postglacial successor to glacial Lake Barlow; Barlow varved clays are present below the floor of Lake Timiskaming as far south as the McConnell Moraine (Fig.
The other type of sand is formed as a result of submarine erosion of Late Pleistocene varved clays up to 30 cm thick (alternating varved horizontal layers of brown clays and grey silty layers) are located in the nearshore, whereas below the sand accretion terrace on the bottom surface there are traces of submarine erosion, indicating sediment transport in NW direction.
A 5,000-yr record of climate change in varved sediments from the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Pakistan, northeastern Arabian Sea.
The role of biogeochemical cycling for the formation and preservation of varved sediments in Soppensee (Switzerland).
Both these sites are located on the riverbank where varved clays underlie the studied deposits and landslides are quite common, thus one can suspect that these deposits are not in situ position.
The till is overlain by glaciolacustrine sands, silts or varved clays, up to 25 m in thickness.
Water movement has been exclusively through fractures and along varved bedding planes for approximately 700,000 years, indicating that in these settings, matrix flow is not occurring.