vaudeville


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

vaude·ville

 (vôd′vĭl′, vōd′-, vô′də-)
n.
1.
a. Stage entertainment offering a variety of short acts such as slapstick turns, song-and-dance routines, and juggling performances.
b. A theatrical performance of this kind; a variety show.
2. A light comic play that often includes songs, pantomime, and dances.
3. A popular, often satirical song.

[French, alteration of Old French vaudevire, occasional or topical light popular song, possibly short for chanson du Vau de Vire, song of Vau de Vire, a valley of northwest France, or perhaps dialectal vauder, to go + virer, to turn; see veer1.]

vaudeville

(ˈvəʊdəvɪl; ˈvɔː-)
n
1. (Theatre) chiefly US and Canadian variety entertainment consisting of short acts such as acrobatic turns, song-and-dance routines, animal acts, etc, popular esp in the early 20th century. Brit name: music hall
2. (Theatre) a light or comic theatrical piece interspersed with songs and dances
[C18: from French, from vaudevire satirical folk song, shortened from chanson du vau de Vire song of the valley of Vire, a district in Normandy where this type of song flourished]

vaude•ville

(ˈvɔd vɪl, ˈvoʊd-, ˈvɔ də-)

n.
1. a form of popular entertainment in the U.S. from the late 1800s to the mid 1920s, having a program of separate and varied acts.
2. a light theatrical piece interspersed with songs and dances.
[1730–40; < French, shortened alter. of Middle French chanson du vau de Vire song of the vale of Vire, a valley of Calvados, France, noted for satirical folksongs]
vaude•vil′lian, n., adj.

vaudeville

- Comes from a French composer calling his songs "chanson du Vau de vire"—"song of the valley of Vire (in Normandy)"—later shortened to "vau de ville."
See also related terms for songs.

vaudeville

A variety review of contemporary song and dance. It enjoyed its heyday before the advent of cinema.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vaudeville - a variety show with songs and comic acts etc.vaudeville - a variety show with songs and comic acts etc.
variety show, variety - a show consisting of a series of short unrelated performances
Translations
فودفيل: إسْتِعْراض مَسْرَحي
kabaretvarieté
syngespilvaudeville
énekes-zenés vígjáték
gamansÿning
vodevilis
vodeviļa
taşlamalı güldürüvodvil

vaudeville

[ˈvəʊdəvɪl] Nvodevil m

vaudeville

[ˈvɔːdəvɪl ˈvəʊdəvɪl] n (mainly US)vaudeville m

vaudeville

n (US) → Varieté nt, → Varietee nt

vaudeville

:
vaudeville show
nVarieté(-) or Varietee (→ vorführung f) nt
vaudeville singer
nVarieté- or Varieteesänger(in) m(f)

vaudeville

[ˈvəʊdəvɪl] n (esp Am) → vaudeville m

vaudeville

(ˈvoːdəvil) noun
the type of theatre show in which there is a variety of short acts; music-hall. There are very few theatres now where vaudeville is performed.
References in classic literature ?
The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin, as he appeared in vaudeville.
You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear.
And he pointed to a magnificent hotel situated on the very spot whereon the Vaudeville now stands.
Don't answer back as though we were a vaudeville team doing a cross-talk act.
My dear," Harley said to Villa at the conclusion of one such singing, "it's fortunate for him that you are not an animal trainer, or, rather, I suppose, it would be better called 'trained animal show-woman'; for you'd be topping the bill in all the music-halls and vaudeville houses of the world.
In short, he renovated them against their next trips out on vaudeville time or circus engagement.
Jacob's-ladder leading to the vaudeville stage, with angels ascending
Some, like the husband of Madame Colleville, Celestine's rival, play in the orchestra of a theatre; others like du Bruel, write vaudeville, comic operas, melodramas, or act as prompters behind the scenes.
INTRIGUE ON THE RAMPARTS; or THE DAY OF REPENTANCE: vaudeville with new songs to the most favorite airs.
I'll make a little piece out of it for the Vaudeville.
The pale and youthful father of a family, with the face of Shelley, who wrote vaudeville turns for a living and blank verse tragedies and sonnet cycles for the despair of managers and publishers, hid himself in a concrete cell with three-foot walls, so piped, that, by turning a lever, the whole structure spouted water upon the impending intruder.
I started it in vaudeville, and went so big that my agent shifted me to the restaurants, and they have to call out the police reserves to handle the crowd.