velocity


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ve·loc·i·ty

 (və-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. ve·loc·i·ties
1. Rapidity or speed of motion; swiftness.
2. Physics A vector quantity whose magnitude is a body's speed and whose direction is the body's direction of motion.
3.
a. The rate of speed of action or occurrence.
b. The rate at which money changes hands in an economy.

[Middle English velocite, from Old French, from Latin vēlōcitās, from vēlōx, vēlōc-, fast; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

velocity

(vɪˈlɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. speed of motion, action, or operation; rapidity; swiftness
2. (Units) physics a measure of the rate of motion of a body expressed as the rate of change of its position in a particular direction with time. It is measured in metres per second, miles per hour, etc. Symbol: u, v or w
3. physics (not in technical usage) another word for speed3
[C16: from Latin vēlōcitās, from vēlōx swift; related to volāre to fly]

ve•loc•i•ty

(vəˈlɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. rapidity of motion, action, or operation; swiftness; speed.
2. Mech. the time rate of change of position of a body in a specified direction.
[1540–50; < Latin vēlōcitās speed. See velocipede, -ty2]
syn: See speed.

ve·loc·i·ty

(və-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
The rate at which an object moves in a specified direction.
Usage We normally think of velocity as the speed at which an object is traveling. But in physics, velocity and speed are not the same. Like speed, velocity refers to the rate at which an object is moving—the distance per unit of time. But velocity in physics also includes the direction in which the object is moving, whereas direction has no bearing on an object's speed. For example, if two cars were driving at a rate of 50 miles per hour, and both headed due north, you could rightly say that they were both traveling at the same speed and at the same velocity. But if one of the cars were to turn west at a certain point, continuing at the same rate of 50 miles per hour, you could only say that they were traveling at the same speed, not at the same velocity. Similarly, traveling around a curve, a car may maintain the same speed throughout, but its velocity will be constantly changing. This change in velocity over time is called acceleration.

velocity

Rate of motion in a particular direction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.velocity - distance travelled per unit timevelocity - distance travelled per unit time  
angular velocity - (physics) the rate of change of the angular position of a rotating body; usually expressed in radians per second or radians per minute
airspeed - the speed of an aircraft relative to the air in which it is flying
escape velocity - the minimum velocity needed to escape a gravitational field
groundspeed - the speed of an aircraft relative to the ground
hypervelocity - excessive velocity; "the meteorites struck the earth with hypervelocity impacts"
muzzle velocity - the velocity of a projectile as it leaves the muzzle of a gun
peculiar velocity - velocity with respect to the local standard of rest
radial velocity - velocity along the line of sight toward or away from the observer
light speed, speed of light, c - the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second
steerageway - (nautical) the minimum rate of motion needed for a vessel to be maneuvered
terminal velocity - the constant maximum velocity reached by a body falling through the atmosphere under the attraction of gravity
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"

velocity

noun speed, pace, rapidity, quickness, swiftness, fleetness, celerity the velocity at which the planets orbit

velocity

noun
Rate of motion or performance:
Informal: clip.
Translations
سُرْعَه
rychlost
hastighedvelocitet
nopeusvauhti
hraîi
ātrums
farthastighet

velocity

[vɪˈlɒsɪtɪ] Nvelocidad f

velocity

[vɪˈlɒsəti] nvitesse f

velocity

velocity

[vɪˈlɒsɪtɪ] nvelocità f inv

velocity

(vəˈlosəti) noun
speed, especially in a given direction.
References in classic literature ?
The river glanced by with its ordinary velocity, but the canoe was nowhere to be seen on its dark waters.
Her face glowed with fire-heat, and, it being a pretty warm morning, she bubbled and hissed, as it were, as if all a-fry with chimney-warmth, and summer-warmth, and the warmth of her own corpulent velocity.
Very shy; always going solitary; unexpectedly rising to the surface in the remotest and most sullen waters; his straight and single lofty jet rising like a tall misanthropic spear upon a barren plain; gifted with such wondrous power and velocity in swimming, as to defy all present pursuit from man; this leviathan seems the banished and unconquerable Cain of his race, bearing for his mark that style upon his back.
With one intent all the combined rival boats were pointed for this one fish, because not only was he the largest, and therefore the most valuable whale, but he was nearest to them, and the other whales were going with such great velocity, moreover, as almost to defy pursuit for the time.
While he spoke, Emma's mind was most busy, and, with all the wonderful velocity of thought, had been ableand yet without losing a word to catch and comprehend the exact truth of the whole; to see that Harriet's hopes had been entirely groundless, a mistake, a delusion, as complete a delusion as any of her ownthat Harriet was nothing; that she was every thing herself; that what she had been saying relative to Harriet had been all taken as the language of her own feelings; and that her agitation, her doubts, her reluctance, her discouragement, had been all received as discouragement from herself.
You will remind me of the experiment of that illustrious philosopher who measured the velocity of a great storm by a flight of small feathers.
It is one of the few social laws of which we are fairly sure, that a nation organizes in proportion to its velocity.
Then, having eaten those that he gave her, she would often search his pockets with gestures that had all the mechanical velocity of a monkey's motions.
This decease was doubted in the house of the receiver-general; but at the Prefecture it was authenticated that the poor beast had expired as she turned into the courtyard of the hotel Cormon, with such velocity had the old maid flown to meet her husband.
A whirlwind had apparently collected its force in our vicinity; for there were frequent and violent alterations in the direction of the wind; and the exceeding density of the clouds (which hung so low as to press upon the turrets of the house) did not prevent our perceiving the lifelike velocity with which they flew careering from all points against each other, without passing away into the distance.
which I naturally assumed to be Women) interspersed with other Beings still smaller and of the nature of lustrous points -- all moving to and fro in one and the same Straight Line, and, as nearly as I could judge, with the same velocity.
As I rose above the city I circled several times, as I had seen Kantos Kan do, and then throwing my engine into top speed I raced at terrific velocity toward the south, following one of the great waterways which enter Zodanga from that direction.