veneration


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ven·er·a·tion

 (vĕn′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. A feeling of profound respect or reverence: an object held in veneration. See Synonyms at honor.
2. The act of venerating: displayed their veneration of the saint with a procession.

ven′er·a′tion·al adj.

veneration

(ˌvɛnəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. a feeling or expression of awe or reverence
2. the act of venerating or the state of being venerated
ˌvenerˈational adj

ven•er•a•tion

(ˌvɛn əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of venerating or the state of being venerated.
2. the feeling of a person who venerates.
3. an expression of this feeling.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.veneration - a feeling of profound respect for someone or somethingveneration - a feeling of profound respect for someone or something; "the fear of God"; "the Chinese reverence for the dead"; "the French treat food with gentle reverence"; "his respect for the law bordered on veneration"
emotion - any strong feeling
2.veneration - religious zealveneration - religious zeal; the willingness to serve God
worship - the activity of worshipping
Bible-worship, bibliolatry - the worship of the Bible
grammatolatry, verbolatry, word-worship - the worship of words
symbolatry, symbololatry, symbol-worship - the worship of symbols
anthropolatry, worship of man - the worship of human beings
gynaeolatry, gyneolatry, woman-worship - the worship of women
lordolatry - the worship of a lord because of his rank or title
miracle-worship, thaumatolatry - the worship of miracles
place-worship, topolatry - the worship of places

veneration

noun respect, esteem, reverence, worship, awe, deference, adoration Churchill was held in veneration in his lifetime.

veneration

noun
The act of adoring, especially reverently:
Translations
تَبْجيل، تَوْقير
úcta
ærbødighed
djúp virîing

veneration

[ˌvenəˈreɪʃən] Nveneración f
his veneration forla veneración que sentía por ...
to hold sb in venerationreverenciar a algn

veneration

[ˌvɛnəˈreɪʃən] nvénération f
to be held in veneration → être vénéré(e)venereal disease [vɪˌnɪəriəldɪˈziːz] nmaladie f vénérienne

veneration

nBewunderung f, → Verehrung f(of für); (of idols)Verehrung f; (of traditions)Ehrfurcht f (→ of vor +dat); to hold somebody in venerationjdn hoch achten or verehren

veneration

[ˌvɛnəˈreɪʃn] nvenerazione f

venerate

(ˈvenəreit) verb
to respect; to honour greatly. In some countries, old people are venerated more than in others.
ˈvenerable adjective
worthy of great respect because of age or for special goodness. a venerable old man.
ˌveneˈration noun
His pupils regarded him with veneration.
References in classic literature ?
I remember vividly another evening, when something led us to talk of Dante's veneration for Virgil.
During this eulogium on the rare production of his native poets, the stranger had drawn the book from his pocket, and fitting a pair of iron-rimmed spectacles to his nose, opened the volume with a care and veneration suited to its sacred purposes.
The remainder may perhaps be applied to purposes equally valuable hereafter, or not impossibly may be worked up, so far as they go, into a regular history of Salem, should my veneration for the natal soil ever impel me to so pious a task.
Indeed, place this reversed skull (scaled down to the human magnitude) among a plate of men's skulls, and you would involuntarily confound it with them; and remarking the depressions on one part of its summit, in phrenological phrase you would say --This man had no self-esteem, and no veneration.
Clare, getting up and walking to a picture at the end of the room, and gazing upward with a face fervent with veneration, "she was divine
Manure is evidently the Black-Forester's main treasure--his coin, his jewel, his pride, his Old Master, his ceramics, his bric-a-brac, his darling, his title to public consideration, envy, veneration, and his first solicitude when he gets ready to make his will.
But it is a pleasure to me to admire him at a distanceand to think of his infinite superiority to all the rest of the world, with the gratitude, wonder, and veneration, which are so proper, in me especially.
I suppose I have a considerable organ of veneration, for I retain yet the sense of admiring awe with which my eyes traced her steps.
But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round -- apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that -- as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.
Therefore I gave him one of my three bright shillings, which he received with much humility and veneration, and spun up with his thumb, directly afterwards, to try the goodness of.
The Pilgrim mounted with more deliberation, reaching, as he departed, his hand to Gurth, who kissed it with the utmost possible veneration.
that a prince possessed of every quality which procures veneration, love, and esteem; of strong parts, great wisdom, and profound learning, endowed with admirable talents, and almost adored by his subjects, should, from a nice, unnecessary scruple, whereof in Europe we can have no conception, let slip an opportunity put into his hands that would have made him absolute master of the lives, the liberties, and the fortunes of his people