vent


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vent 1

 (vĕnt)
n.
1. Forceful expression or release of pent-up thoughts or feelings: give vent to one's anger.
2. An opening permitting the escape of fumes, a liquid, a gas, or steam.
3. The small hole at the breech of a gun through which the charge is ignited.
4. Zoology The excretory opening of the digestive tract in animals such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.
5. Geology
a. The opening of a volcano in the earth's crust.
b. An opening on the ocean floor that emits hot water and dissolved minerals.
v. vent·ed, vent·ing, vents
v.tr.
1. To express (one's thoughts or feelings, for example), especially forcefully. See Synonyms at voice.
2. To release or discharge (steam, for example) through an opening.
3. To provide with a vent.
v.intr.
1. To vent one's feelings or opinions: Sorry to go on like that, but I just had to vent.
2. To be released or discharged through an opening.
3. To rise to the surface of water to breathe. Used of a marine mammal.

[Partly from French vent (from Old French) and partly alteration of French évent (from Old French esvent, from esventer, to let out air, from Vulgar Latin *exventāre : Latin ex-; see ex- + Latin ventus, wind; see wē- in Indo-European roots).]

vent′er n.

vent 2

 (vĕnt)
n.
A slit in a garment, as in the back seam of a jacket.

[Middle English vente, alteration (probably influenced by Old French vent, wind) of fente, from Old French, slit, from fendre, to split open, from Latin findere; see fission.]

vent

(vɛnt)
n
1. a small opening for the passage or escape of fumes, liquids, etc
2. (Geological Science) the shaft of a volcano or an aperture in the earth's crust through which lava and gases erupt
3. (Zoology) the external opening of the urinary or genital systems of lower vertebrates
4. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a small aperture at the breech of old guns through which the charge was ignited
5. an exit, escape, or passage
6. give vent to to release (an emotion, passion, idea, etc) in an utterance or outburst
vb (mainly tr)
7. to release or give expression or utterance to (an emotion, idea, etc): he vents his anger on his wife.
8. to provide a vent for or make vents in
9. to let out (steam, liquid, etc) through a vent
[C14: from Old French esventer to blow out, from ex-1 + venter, from Vulgar Latin ventāre (unattested) to be windy, from Latin ventus wind]
ˈventer n
ˈventless adj

vent

(vɛnt)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a vertical slit at the back or both sides of a jacket
vb
(Knitting & Sewing) (tr) to make a vent or vents in (a jacket)
[C15: from Old French fente slit, from fendre to split, from Latin findere to cleave]

vent1

(vɛnt)

n.
1. an opening, as in a wall, serving as an outlet for air, fumes, or the like.
2. an opening at the earth's surface from which volcanic material, as lava or gas, is emitted.
3. a means of exit or escape; an outlet, as from confinement.
4. expression; utterance; release: giving vent to one's emotions.
5. the small opening at the breech of a gun by which fire is communicated to the charge.
6. Zool. the external opening of the cloaca.
v.t.
7. to give free play or expression to (an emotion).
8. to relieve through such expression: to vent one's disappointment.
9. to release or discharge (liquid, smoke, etc.).
10. to furnish or provide with a vent or vents.
v.i.
11. to be relieved of pressure or discharged by means of a vent.
12. (of a marine animal) to rise to the surface of the water to breathe.
13. to openly express powerful emotions, esp. ones that are normally suppressed.
[1350–1400; Middle English (v.): to furnish (a vessel) with a vent, by aphesis < Old French aventer, esventer < Latin ventus wind1]

vent2

(vɛnt)

n.
a slit in the back or side of a coat, jacket, or other garment, at the bottom part of a seam.
[1400–50; late Middle English vente; replacing Middle English fente < Middle French, derivative of fendre to slit < Latin findere to split]

vent


Past participle: vented
Gerund: venting

Imperative
vent
vent
Present
I vent
you vent
he/she/it vents
we vent
you vent
they vent
Preterite
I vented
you vented
he/she/it vented
we vented
you vented
they vented
Present Continuous
I am venting
you are venting
he/she/it is venting
we are venting
you are venting
they are venting
Present Perfect
I have vented
you have vented
he/she/it has vented
we have vented
you have vented
they have vented
Past Continuous
I was venting
you were venting
he/she/it was venting
we were venting
you were venting
they were venting
Past Perfect
I had vented
you had vented
he/she/it had vented
we had vented
you had vented
they had vented
Future
I will vent
you will vent
he/she/it will vent
we will vent
you will vent
they will vent
Future Perfect
I will have vented
you will have vented
he/she/it will have vented
we will have vented
you will have vented
they will have vented
Future Continuous
I will be venting
you will be venting
he/she/it will be venting
we will be venting
you will be venting
they will be venting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been venting
you have been venting
he/she/it has been venting
we have been venting
you have been venting
they have been venting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been venting
you will have been venting
he/she/it will have been venting
we will have been venting
you will have been venting
they will have been venting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been venting
you had been venting
he/she/it had been venting
we had been venting
you had been venting
they had been venting
Conditional
I would vent
you would vent
he/she/it would vent
we would vent
you would vent
they would vent
Past Conditional
I would have vented
you would have vented
he/she/it would have vented
we would have vented
you would have vented
they would have vented
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vent - a hole for the escape of gas or airvent - a hole for the escape of gas or air
air duct, air passage, airway - a duct that provides ventilation (as in mines)
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
smoke hole - a vent (as in a roof) for smoke to escape
2.vent - external opening of urinary or genital system of a lower vertebrate
orifice, porta, opening - an aperture or hole that opens into a bodily cavity; "the orifice into the aorta from the lower left chamber of the heart"
3.vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases eruptvent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt
crack, scissure, cleft, crevice, fissure - a long narrow opening
eructation, extravasation, eruption - (of volcanos) pouring out fumes or lava (or a deposit so formed)
active - (of e.g. volcanos) erupting or liable to erupt; "active volcanos"
4.vent - a slit in a garment (as in the back seam of a jacket)
slit - a long narrow opening
5.vent - activity that frees or expresses creative energy or emotion; "she had no other outlet for her feelings"; "he gave vent to his anger"
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
Verb1.vent - give expression or utterance to; "She vented her anger"; "The graduates gave vent to cheers"
evince, express, show - give expression to; "She showed her disappointment"
2.vent - expose to cool or cold air so as to cool or freshenvent - expose to cool or cold air so as to cool or freshen; "air the old winter clothes"; "air out the smoke-filled rooms"
freshen, refresh - make (to feel) fresh; "The cool water refreshed us"

vent

noun
1. outlet, opening, hole, split, aperture, duct, orifice There was a small air vent in the ceiling.
verb
1. express, release, voice, air, empty, discharge, utter, emit, come out with, pour out, give vent to, give expression to She telephoned her best friend to vent her frustration.
express repress, curb, inhibit, hold back, subdue, stifle, quash, quell, bottle up

vent

noun
An open space allowing passage:
verb
1. To utter publicly:
2. To put into words:
Idiom: give tongue to.
3. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
Translations
فُتْحَة تَهْوِئَهيُنَفِّس عَن
otvorvylít si
give luft forlufthul
fá útrás fyrirloftop
anga
dūmvadsejaizgāzt
vyliať si

vent

[vent]
A. N
1. (Mech) → agujero m; (= valve) → válvula f; (= airhole) → respiradero m; (= grille) → rejilla f de ventilación; (= pipe) → ventosa f, conducto m de ventilación
2. (= opening) (in jacket, skirt) → abertura f
3. (Zool) → cloaca f
4. (= expression) to give vent to one's feelingsdesahogarse
to give vent to one's angerdar rienda suelta a su ira, desahogar su ira
B. VT
1. (Mech) → purgar; (= discharge) → descargar, emitir, dejar escapar
2. (= release) [+ feelings] → desahogar, descargar
to vent one's anger on sth/sbdesahogar la ira con algo/algn
to vent one's spleen (on)descargar la bilis (contra)

vent

[ˈvɛnt]
n
(= duct) → conduit m d'aération
(in dress, jacket)fente f
to give vent to sth [+ feelings, anger] → laisser libre cours à qch
vt [+ anger, feelings] → passer
to vent one's anger on sb/sth → passer sa colère sur qn/qch
The rioters vented their anger on the police → Les émeutiers ont passé leur colère sur la police.

vent

n (for gas, liquid) → Öffnung f; (in chimney) → Abzug m; (in barrel) → Spundloch nt; (in coat) → Schlitz m; (for feelings) → Ventil nt; jacket with a single/double ventJacke mit Rückenschlitz m/Seitenschlitzen pl; to give vent to something (fig)einer Sache (dat)Ausdruck verleihen; to give vent to one’s feelingsseinen Gefühlen freien Lauf lassen; to give vent to one’s angerseinem Ärger Luft machen
vt feelings, angerabreagieren (→ on an +dat); to vent one’s spleensich (dat)Luft machen; to vent one’s spleen on somebodyseine Wut an jdm auslassen

vent

[vɛnt]
1. n (Tech) (airhole) → presa d'aria; (of jacket) → spacco
to give vent to one's anger → sfogare la propria rabbia
2. vt to vent one's anger (on sb/sth)scaricare or sfogare la propria rabbia (su qn/qc)

vent

(vent) noun
a hole to allow air, smoke etc to pass out or in. an air-vent.
verb
to give expression or an outlet to (an emotion etc). He was angry with himself and vented his rage on his son by beating him violently.
give vent to
to express (an emotion etc) freely. He gave vent to his anger in a furious letter to the newspaper.
References in classic literature ?
She was rather a favorite with `old Davis', as, of course, he was called, and it's my private belief that he would have broken his word if the indignation of one irrepressible young lady had not found vent in a hiss.
I do not want to harness you to a needless expense that will pre- vent your making progress.
exclaimed Heyward, undecided whether to give vent to his growing anger, or to laugh in the other's face.
For what end," thought she, giving vent to that feeling of hostility which is the only real abasement of the poor in presence of the rich,--"for what good end, in the wisdom of Providence, does that woman live?
Wave after wave thus leaps into the ship, and finding no speedy vent runs roaring fore and aft, till the mariners come nigh to drowning while yet afloat.
From this last vent no blood yet came, because no vital part of him had thus far been struck.
He would sit down and listen and stare at him, and give vent to delighted exclamations--"Palauk
Mistress, in teaching me the alphabet, had given me the ~inch,~ and no precaution could pre- vent me from taking the ~ell.
When they had nothing else to say, it must be always easy to begin abusing Miss Woodhouse; and the enmity which they dared not shew in open disrespect to her, found a broader vent in contemptuous treatment of Harriet.
and by the means of this continual though gentle vent, was able not only to see the Miss Dashwoods from the first without the smallest emotion, but very soon to see them without recollecting a word of the matter; and having thus supported the dignity of her own sex, and spoken her decided censure of what was wrong in the other, she thought herself at liberty to attend to the interest of her own assemblies, and therefore determined (though rather against the opinion of Sir John) that as Mrs.
Too often she betrayed this, by the undue vent she gave to a spiteful antipathy she had conceived against little Adele: pushing her away with some contumelious epithet if she happened to approach her; sometimes ordering her from the room, and always treating her with coldness and acrimony.
At learning the chance we had missed, we both gave vent to our grief without control; and he allowed us to wail on till nine o'clock.