ventriloquy


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ven·tril·o·quy

 (vĕn-trĭl′ə-kwē)
n.
Ventriloquism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ventriloquy - the art of projecting your voice so that it seems to come from another source (as from a ventriloquist's dummy)ventriloquy - the art of projecting your voice so that it seems to come from another source (as from a ventriloquist's dummy)
artistry, prowess, art - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
Translations

ventriloquy

nBauchredekunst f, → Bauchreden nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of this affective subjectification are multiple, but I find that the most illuminating involve the courts' ventriloquy of the HIV-positive persons standing before them.
That final attribution could have been the result of: textual proximity, in which an oblivious reader saw Chekhov's name and blindly attributed the quotation to him; ventriloquy, in which a reader found the line so resonated with Chekhov's style that these words were mistaken for his; or some combination.
The idea of a show in which the puppets and the puppeteers worked side by side, with no attempt to create an illusion of ventriloquy, was revolutionary.
And no more of this apostrophizing ventriloquy, with which you would have no patience.
The rest make him merely the medium for her ventriloquy.
Voice and Ventriloquy in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:"" Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
With an extravagant sleight of hand, they conjure a ventriloquy of selves, and with considerable pageantry each "struts and frets his hour upon the stage" all the while anxiously engaged in the making of character.
The vehicle in question is Landon's identification as the "English Corinne," achieved through her many tributes to, and ventriloquy of, Getmaine de Stall's half-Italian, half-English heroine.
They thus imply an ethics of autobiographical memory marked by ventriloquy and spectrality (in the sense of Derrida's Specters of Marx).
and the ironic ventriloquy He bestowed on your birthplace: Susurrus of
foreign policy during the Cold War, historian Bruce Kuklick equated these scholars with the "primitive shaman" who performs "feats of ventriloquy.
In Phillips's writing, according to Bewes, shame is to be found "embedded in situations, narratives, and characters" (55), yet also "in two closely related, apparently superficial elements which proliferate inseparably from them: ventriloquy and cliche" (61).