ventriloquist

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Related to ventriloquistic: ventriloquising

ven·tril·o·quist

 (vĕn-trĭl′ə-kwĭst)
n.
One, especially an entertainer, who is adept at ventriloquism.

ven·tril′o·quis′tic adj.

ven•tril•o•quist

(vɛnˈtrɪl ə kwɪst)

n.
a person who performs or is skilled in ventriloquism.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ventriloquist - a performer who projects the voice into a wooden dummyventriloquist - a performer who projects the voice into a wooden dummy
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
Translations
مُقامِق: مُتَكَلِّم من بَطْنِه
břichomluvec
bugtaler
vatsastapuhuja
hasbeszélõhasbeszélő
búktalari
pilvakalbyspilvakalbystė
vēderrunātājs
bruchovravec
karnından konuşan kimsevantrilok

ventriloquist

[venˈtrɪləkwɪst] Nventrílocuo/a m/f

ventriloquist

[vɛnˈtrɪləkwɪst] nventriloque mfventriloquist's dummy npoupée f de ventriloque

ventriloquist

nBauchredner(in) m(f)

ventriloquist

[vɛnˈtrɪləkwɪst] nventriloquo/a

ventriloquist

(venˈtriləkwist) noun
a professional entertainer who can speak so that his voice seems to come from some other person or place, especially from a dummy which he controls.
venˈtriloquism noun
References in periodicals archive ?
A natural man, full of gentle mischief as anyone startled by Chick's phenomena] ventriloquistic talent can testify.
Roth expands and transforms this conflicting, quarreling, and contradictory definition of the Jewish condition in his fiction through his characteristically ironic, critical, and rebellious assessment, but mostly through the subtleties, the intricacies, the brilliances of language, the written word a measure of inspired, ventriloquistic, artful masquerade, "the art of impersonation," which is, after all, as Roth admits, "the fundamental novelistic gift" (Lee and Roth 143).
Wakefield can be appreciated as coarticulator of a ventriloquistic logos and choreographer of a telescopic parallactic vision.
As a storyteller, he resembles the narrator in his penchant for slippery, ventriloquistic narration; he can adopt any voice, even the ticking of the crocodile, hence perhaps Hook's hatred of Peter, even though he is "such a small boy" (176): "Pan," he asks, "who and what art thou?
Roethke's Open House is slight and derivative, a pastiche of the restrained formalism of his one-time lover Louise Bogan and his friend Stanley Kunitz; Berryman's The Dispossessed is similarly ventriloquistic, the models in his case being Auden and Yeats.
Slippery, pseudonymous and ventriloquistic, their articulations reveal the necessity for scholars to think beyond homogenous or binary categories for textual consumption.
In translation the ventriloquistic, cross-temporal, "loophole" discourse that marks the opening of Quentin's section is elevated into a grandiose, homophonic litany.
His style of philosophical exposition is best described as theatrical or ventriloquistic.