veranda

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ve·ran·da

or ve·ran·dah  (və-răn′də)
n.
A porch or balcony, usually roofed and often partly enclosed, extending along the outside of a building. Also called regionally gallery.

[Hindi varaṇḍā, probably from Portuguese varanda, balcony; akin to vara, rod, stick (as in vara do castello, high part of a castle from which one can see farthest into the distance), from Latin vāra, forked pole, structure with divergent pieces, trestle.]

veranda

(vəˈrændə) or

verandah

n
1. (Architecture) a porch or portico, sometimes partly enclosed, along the outside of a building
2. (Architecture) NZ a canopy sheltering pedestrians in a shopping street
[C18: from Portuguese varanda railing; related to Hindi varandā railing]
veˈrandaed, veˈrandahed adj

ve•ran•da

or ve•ran•dah

(vəˈræn də)

n., pl. -das or -dahs.
a porch, usu. roofed and partly enclosed, extending across the front and sides of a house.
[1705–15; < Hindi]
ve•ran′daed, ve•ran′dahed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.veranda - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)veranda - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)
lanai - a veranda or roofed patio often furnished and used as a living room
porch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
Translations
شُرْفَه
veranda

veranda

verandah [vəˈrændə] Ngalería f, veranda f, terraza f

veranda

verandah [vəˈrændə] nvéranda f
on the veranda → sur la véranda

veranda(h)

nVeranda f

veranda

verandah [vəˈrændə] nveranda

veranda(h)

(vəˈrӕndə) noun
(American porch) a kind of covered balcony, with a roof extending beyond the main building supported by light pillars.
References in classic literature ?
On the four verandas of the house the lanterns burned.
The boy carried the long telescope out on the veranda, and searched the sea.
Somebody tried to open my door, and walked about and through the house, and stood breathing heavily in the verandas, and just when I was falling asleep I fancied that I heard a wild hammering and clamoring above my head or on the door.
Tietjens met me in the veranda with a bay like the boom of the bells of St.
UPON THE HALF decayed veranda of a small frame house that stood near the edge of a ravine near the town of Winesburg, Ohio, a fat little old man walked nervously up and down.
Now as the old man walked up and down on the veranda, his hands moving nervously about, he was hoping that George Willard would come and spend the evening with him.
A half hour later he was mounting the steps leading to the veranda of his bungalow, and introducing M.
Werper, sitting upon the veranda, could hear their voices in earnest discussion, and having realized that something of unusual moment was afoot, he quietly rose from his chair, and keeping well in the shadow of the shrubbery growing profusely about the bungalow, made his silent way to a point beneath the window of the room in which his host and hostess slept.
Rikki-tikki liked it immensely, and when it was finished he went out into the veranda and sat in the sunshine and fluffed up his fur to make it dry to the roots.
Early in the morning Rikki-tikki came to early breakfast in the veranda riding on Teddy's shoulder, and they gave him banana and some boiled egg.
In the figure in which he had to choose two ladies, he whispered to Helene that he meant to choose Countess Potocka who, he thought, had gone out onto the veranda, and glided over the parquet to the door opening into the garden, where, seeing Balashev and the Emperor returning to the veranda, he stood still.
She was actually left alone as the morning went on, and at last she wandered out into the garden and began to play by herself under a tree near the veranda.