verbal


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Related to verbal: Verbal reasoning

ver·bal

 (vûr′bəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or associated with words: a detailed verbal description.
2.
a. Concerned with words only rather than with content or ideas: a merely verbal distinction.
b. Consisting of words alone without action: a verbal confrontation.
3. Expressed in spoken rather than written words; oral: a verbal contract.
4. Corresponding word for word; literal: a verbal translation.
5. Grammar
a. Relating to, having the nature or function of, or derived from a verb.
b. Used to form verbs: a verbal suffix.
6. Of or relating to proficiency in the use and understanding of words: a verbal aptitude test.
n. Grammar
A verbal noun or adjective.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin verbālis, from Latin verbum, word; see verb.]

ver′bal·ly adv.

verbal

(ˈvɜːbəl)
adj
1. of, relating to, or using words, esp as opposed to ideas, etc: merely verbal concessions.
2. oral rather than written: a verbal agreement.
3. verbatim; literal: an almost verbal copy.
4. (Grammar) grammar of or relating to verbs or a verb
n
5. (Grammar) grammar another word for verbid
6. (plural) slang abuse or invective: new forms of on-field verbals.
7. (plural) slang a criminal's admission of guilt on arrest
vb (tr) , -bals, -balling or -balled
slang (of the police) to implicate (someone) in a crime by quoting alleged admission of guilt in court
ˈverbally adv

ver•bal

(ˈvɜr bəl)

adj.
1. of or consisting of words: verbal ability.
2. spoken rather than written; oral: verbal communication.
3. concerned with words only, rather than with the ideas, facts, or realities expressed: a purely verbal distinction.
4. corresponding word for word; verbatim: a verbal translation.
5.
a. of, pertaining to, or derived from a verb: a verbal adjective.
b. used in a sentence as or like a verb.
n.
6. a word, esp. a noun or adjective, derived from a verb, as a gerund, infinitive, or participle.
7. a word or group of words functioning as or like a verb.
[1485–95; < Latin verbālis, derivative of verb(um) word (see verb)]
ver′bal•ly, adv.
usage.: verbal has had the meaning “spoken” since the late 16th century and is thus synonymous with oral: I wrote a memorandum to confirm the verbal agreement. This use is sometimes criticized for being etymologically incorrect or ambiguous, though the context usu. makes the meaning clear: No documents are necessary; a verbal order will suffice. oral can always be used if the context demands: My lawyer insists on a written contract because oral agreements are too difficult to enforce.

verbal


Past participle: verballed
Gerund: verballing

Imperative
verbal
verbal
Present
I verbal
you verbal
he/she/it verbals
we verbal
you verbal
they verbal
Preterite
I verballed
you verballed
he/she/it verballed
we verballed
you verballed
they verballed
Present Continuous
I am verballing
you are verballing
he/she/it is verballing
we are verballing
you are verballing
they are verballing
Present Perfect
I have verballed
you have verballed
he/she/it has verballed
we have verballed
you have verballed
they have verballed
Past Continuous
I was verballing
you were verballing
he/she/it was verballing
we were verballing
you were verballing
they were verballing
Past Perfect
I had verballed
you had verballed
he/she/it had verballed
we had verballed
you had verballed
they had verballed
Future
I will verbal
you will verbal
he/she/it will verbal
we will verbal
you will verbal
they will verbal
Future Perfect
I will have verballed
you will have verballed
he/she/it will have verballed
we will have verballed
you will have verballed
they will have verballed
Future Continuous
I will be verballing
you will be verballing
he/she/it will be verballing
we will be verballing
you will be verballing
they will be verballing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been verballing
you have been verballing
he/she/it has been verballing
we have been verballing
you have been verballing
they have been verballing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been verballing
you will have been verballing
he/she/it will have been verballing
we will have been verballing
you will have been verballing
they will have been verballing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been verballing
you had been verballing
he/she/it had been verballing
we had been verballing
you had been verballing
they had been verballing
Conditional
I would verbal
you would verbal
he/she/it would verbal
we would verbal
you would verbal
they would verbal
Past Conditional
I would have verballed
you would have verballed
he/she/it would have verballed
we would have verballed
you would have verballed
they would have verballed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.verbal - communicated in the form of wordsverbal - communicated in the form of words; "verbal imagery"; "a verbal protest"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
2.verbal - of or relating to or formed from words in generalverbal - of or relating to or formed from words in general; "verbal ability"
3.verbal - of or relating to or formed from a verb; "verbal adjectives like `running' in `hot and cold running water'"
4.verbal - relating to or having facility in the use of words; "a good poet is a verbal artist"; "a merely verbal writer who sacrifices content to sound"; "verbal aptitude"
mathematical, numerical - relating to or having ability to think in or work with numbers; "tests for rating numerical aptitude"; "a mathematical whiz"
5.verbal - expressed in spoken wordsverbal - expressed in spoken words; "a verbal contract"
spoken - uttered through the medium of speech or characterized by speech; sometimes used in combination; "a spoken message"; "the spoken language"; "a soft-spoken person"; "sharp-spoken"
6.verbal - prolix; "you put me to forget a lady's manners by being so verbal"- Shakespeare
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

verbal

adjective spoken, oral, word-of-mouth, unwritten, verbatim, literal We have a verbal agreement with our suppliers.

verbal

adjective
1. Relating to, consisting of, or having the nature of words:
2. Expressed or transmitted in speech:
3. Employing the very same words as another:
Translations
فِعْلي، مُتَعَلِّق بالأفْعاللَفْظي، كلامي
slovníslovesný
mundtligverbal
igei
munnlegursagn-, sagnar-
oraleverbaledeverbale
slovesnýslovný
fiil ile ilgilisözlü

verbal

[ˈvɜːbəl] ADJverbal
a verbal agreementun acuerdo verbal
verbal diarrhoeaverborrea f

verbal

[ˈvɜːrbəl] adj
(= spoken) [agreement, warning, attack] → verbal(e)
(= using words) [skills, communication] → verbal(e)
(GRAMMAR) [noun, group] → verbal(e)
a verbal noun → un déverbalverbal abuse ninjures fpl

verbal

adj
(= spoken) statement, agreementmündlich; verbal abuseBeschimpfung f; verbal attackVerbalattacke f; verbal warningmündliche Verwarnung
(= of words) error, skills, distinctionsprachlich; verbal memoryWortgedächtnis nt; a verbal reasoning testein Test mdes logischen Denkvermögens
(= literal) translationwörtlich
(Gram) → verbal

verbal

[ˈvɜːbl] adjverbale

verb

(vəːb) noun
the word or phrase that gives the action, or asserts something, in a sentence, clause etc. I saw him; He ran away from me; I have a feeling; What is this?
ˈverbal adjective
1. of, or concerning, verbs. verbal endings such as `-fy', `-ize'.
2. consisting of, or concerning, spoken words. a verbal warning/agreement.
ˈverbally adverb
in or by speech, not writing. I replied to the invitation verbally.
verbatim (-ˈbeitim) adjective, adverb
word for word. a verbatim report of the argument; The child repeated my words verbatim.
verbose (-ˈbous) adjective
using too many words; expressed in too many words. a verbose speaker; a verbose description/style.
References in classic literature ?
The authority which we have chiefly followed -- a manuscript of old date, drawn up from the verbal testimony of individuals, some of whom had known Hester Prynne, while others had heard the tale from contemporary witnesses fully confirms the view taken in the foregoing pages.
If by day they chanced to speak one word; by night, dumb men were both, so far as concerned the slightest verbal interchange.
Topsy had an uncommon verbal memory, and committed with a fluency that greatly encouraged her instructress.
Did you send me verbal information, by the commander of the ship, to the effect that upon his return to you, with supplies, you were going to leave Cadiz --"
I was entirely out of verbal obliquities; to go further would be to lie, and that I would not do; so I simply sat still and suffered --sat mutely and resignedly there, and sizzled--for I was being slowly fried to death in my own blushes.
The invitation was refused, and by a verbal message.
It was now above a week since John Dashwood had called in Berkeley Street, and as since that time no notice had been taken by them of his wife's indisposition, beyond one verbal enquiry, Elinor began to feel it necessary to pay her a visit.
Vanstone sat down composedly under his daughter's flow of language, like a man who was well used to verbal inundation from that quarter.
I would not consent to your being charged with any written answer, but perhaps you will take a verbal one?
Then I playfully tried verbal instruction in domestic matters, as we walked about on a Saturday afternoon.
It was not a verbal remark, but a proceeding in dump show, and was pointedly addressed to me.
Neighbours who had nothing but verbal consolation to give showed a disposition not only to greet Silas and discuss his misfortune at some length when they encountered him in the village, but also to take the trouble of calling at his cottage and getting him to repeat all the details on the very spot; and then they would try to cheer him by saying, "Well, Master Marner, you're no worse off nor other poor folks, after all; and if you was to be crippled, the parish 'ud give you a 'lowance.