verbiage


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Related to verbiage: wordage

ver·bi·age

 (vûr′bē-ĭj, -bĭj)
n.
1. An excess of words for the purpose; wordiness.
2. The manner in which something is expressed in words: software verbiage.

[French, from Middle French : verbier, to warble, twitter, prattle (variant of earlier verboier; akin to Old French guerbler, to sing in a certain way (perhaps by using modulations); see warble) + -age, n. suff. (influenced in sense by verbe, word).]

verbiage

(ˈvɜːbɪɪdʒ)
n
1. the excessive and often meaningless use of words; verbosity
2. rare diction; wording
[C18: from French, from Old French verbier to chatter, from verbe word, from Latin verbum]

ver•bi•age

(ˈvɜr bi ɪdʒ)

n.
1. overabundance or superfluity of words, as in writing or speech.
2. manner or style of expressing something in words; wording.
[1715–25; < French, = Middle French verbi(er) to gabble (compare early Picard dial. verbloier, werbler to warble1) + -age -age]

verbiage

wordiness or prolixity; an excess of words.
See also: Language

Verbiage

 a large number or overuse of words, 1721.
Examples: verbiage of the parlour fireside, 1814; of pleadings, 1787; of words, 1721.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verbiage - overabundance of wordsverbiage - overabundance of words    
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words
2.verbiage - the manner in which something is expressed in words; "use concise military verbiage"- G.S.Patton
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
mot juste - the appropriate word or expression
verbalisation, verbalization - the words that are spoken in the activity of verbalization

verbiage

noun verbosity, repetition, tautology, redundancy, circumlocution, prolixity, periphrasis, pleonasm His writing is full of pretentious and self-indulgent verbiage.

verbiage

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations
ordgyteri

verbiage

[ˈvɜːbɪɪdʒ] Nverborrea f, palabrería f

verbiage

nWortwust m, → Wortfülle f, → Blabla nt (inf); you won’t impress the examiners with a lot of verbiagemit Geschwafel ntor Blabla nt (inf)kannst du die Prüfer nicht beeindrucken; there’s too much verbiage in this reportdieser Bericht ist zu umständlich geschrieben

verbiage

[ˈvɜːbɪɪdʒ] n (frm, pej) → verbalismo
References in classic literature ?
Then the love-thoughts of the heart clothed themselves simply and naturally as the heart conceived them, nor sought to commend themselves by forced and rambling verbiage.
The response of a reader depends on the mood of the moment, so much so that a book may seem extremely interesting when read late at night, but might appear merely a lot of vapid verbiage in the morning.
Ah," said Percival, "I perceive you both know the South Seas, wherefore, without undue expenditure of verbiage on my part, I am assured that you will appreciate the charm of my princess, the Princess Tui-nui of Talofa, the Princess of the Isle of Love.
He is generally a smooth and fluent versifier, but his fluency is his undoing; he wraps up his material in too great a mass of verbiage.
My dear fellow I have merely stripped the rags of business verbiage and financial jargon off my statements.
And as the elevator stopped at the next floor down to take on a pair of maids, he strolled over to the shaft, and without frills or verbiage consigned me and my detail to perdition.
Technically the company filed a recent trademark for its new Apple TV with Siri Remote and under its global class 9 verbiage 'home automation hubs' is listed.
Guys is a trashy piece of transatlantic verbiage which has become currency via various American imported soaps and series.
When you deadhead the gibberish jargon and verbiage of the duties of the posts it is evident that the authority is looking for a qualified accountant and chartered engineer.
The Duke of Kent was killed serving with the RAF, Prince Harry was in Afghanistan with Forward Air Control as a co-pilot/gunner in 2006 and Prince Andrew was at the Falklands in 1980 as a helicopter pilot, so it looks as if the royal princes did not somehow avoid bombs and bullets and your verbiage is nothing more than a right anti-royal sized chip on your shoulder on this one subject.
District Judge Susan Illston of San Francisco has ruled that the suit hinged on verbiage used outside of financial statement, and therefore dismissed it.
While that won't be a surprise if it happens, it will require additional verbiage changes in a statement that hasn't been forced to undergo any meaningful changes in months.