verbose


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ver·bose

 (vər-bōs′)
adj.
Using or containing a great and usually an excessive number of words; wordy. See Synonyms at wordy.

[Middle English *verbous, from Latin verbōsus, from verbum, word; see verb.]

ver·bose′ly adv.
ver·bose′ness, ver·bos′i·ty (-bŏs′ĭ-tē) n.

verbose

(vɜːˈbəʊs)
adj
using or containing an excess of words, so as to be pedantic or boring; prolix
[C17: from Latin verbōsus from verbum word]
verˈbosely adv
verbosity, verˈboseness n

ver•bose

(vərˈboʊs)

adj.
expressed in or characterized by the use of many or too many words; wordy: a verbose report; a verbose speaker.
[1665–75; < Latin verbōsus=verb(um) word + -ōsus -ose1]
ver•bose′ly, adv.
ver•bos′i•ty (-ˈbɒs ɪ ti) ver•bose′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.verbose - using or containing too many wordsverbose - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

verbose

verbose

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
كَثير الحَشْو بالكَلام
upovídaný
ordrig
bőbeszédűfecsegőszószátyár
冗長な
táravý
ağzı kalabalıkgereksiz sözlerle dolu

verbose

[vɜːˈbəʊs] ADJ [person] → verboso, hablador; [writing, style] → prolijo, verboso

verbose

[vɜːrˈbəʊs] adjverbeux/euse

verbose

[vɜːˈbəʊs] adjverboso/a, prolisso/a

verb

(vəːb) noun
the word or phrase that gives the action, or asserts something, in a sentence, clause etc. I saw him; He ran away from me; I have a feeling; What is this?
ˈverbal adjective
1. of, or concerning, verbs. verbal endings such as `-fy', `-ize'.
2. consisting of, or concerning, spoken words. a verbal warning/agreement.
ˈverbally adverb
in or by speech, not writing. I replied to the invitation verbally.
verbatim (-ˈbeitim) adjective, adverb
word for word. a verbatim report of the argument; The child repeated my words verbatim.
verbose (-ˈbous) adjective
using too many words; expressed in too many words. a verbose speaker; a verbose description/style.
References in classic literature ?
Chadband's piling verbose flights of stairs, one upon another, after this fashion.
But I thought that was perhaps no more than a natural reserve accentuated by the verbose frankness of her husband.
I must confess," she continued, "that if I had known how many classics there are in English literature, and how verbose the best of them contrive to be, I should never have undertaken the work.
He strode down the stairs with tingling pulses, and drove to the House, where his speech, a little florid in its rhetoric, and verbose as became the man, was nevertheless a great success.
Levin smiled joyfully; he was struck by this transition from the confused, verbose discussion with Pestsov and his brother to this laconic, clear, almost wordless communication of the most complex ideas.
It spoke about the need for concise books that use graphics instead of verbose texts to explain concepts, the need to split books in to two halves for two terms and to eliminate the need of textbooks in primary classes altogether.
The verbose Labourite, a stranger to brevity, must've delivered his shorter speech.
THEY SAY "While I am now famously verbose, I was a late talker as a child.
This seemed the ideal profession to satisfy both desires" Former Fleet Street editor Piers Morgan on why he entered journalism "While I am now famously verbose, I was a late talker as a child.
Then there is the case of Malky Mackay, sacked by Cardiff City for alleged racist and sexist comments, and the subject of an ongoing inquiry by the Football Association, who has now been employed by Wigan Athletic, whose verbose Chairman, Dave Whelan, now finds himself the subject of an FA inquiry, for claiming that Mackay has done nothing wrong, and who has come out with some outrageous comments himself.
Then there is the case of Malky Mackay, sacked by Cardiff City for racist, sexist and homophobic comments, and the subject of an ongoing inquiry by the Football Association, who has now been employed by Wigan Athletic, whose verbose chairman, Dave Whelan, now finds himself the subject of an FA inquiry, for claiming that Mackay has done nothing wrong, and who has come out with some outrageous comments himself.
Bob likes to mind his own business, while the more verbose Cousin Marv (James Gandolfini) takes overall responsibility for the money.