verge


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verge 1

 (vûrj)
n.
1.
a. An edge or margin; a border. See Synonyms at border.
b. Architecture The edge of the tiling that projects over a roof gable.
c. Chiefly British A grassy border, as along a road.
2. The point beyond which an action, state, or condition is likely to begin or occur; the brink: on the verge of tears; a nation on the verge of economic prosperity.
3. A rod, wand, or staff carried as an emblem of authority or office.
4. The spindle of a balance wheel in a clock or watch, especially such a spindle in a clock with vertical escapement.
5. The male organ of copulation in certain mollusks.
intr.v. verged, verg·ing, verg·es
1. To approach the nature or condition of something specified; come close. Used with on: a brilliance verging on genius.
2. To be on the edge or border: Her land verges on the neighboring township.

[Middle English, from Old French, rod, ring, from Latin virga, rod, strip.]

verge 2

 (vûrj)
intr.v. verged, verg·ing, verg·es
1. To slope or incline.
2. To tend to move in a particular direction: "the Neoclassicism ... away from which they subsequently verged" (Hugh Honour).
3. To pass or merge gradually: dusk verging into night.

[Latin vergere; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

verge

(vɜːdʒ)
n
1. an edge or rim; margin
2. a limit beyond which something occurs; brink: on the verge of ecstasy.
3. Brit a grass border along a road
4. an enclosing line, belt, or strip
5. (Architecture) architect the edge of the roof tiles projecting over a gable
6. (Architecture) architect the shaft of a classical column
7. an enclosed space
8. (Horology) horology the spindle of a balance wheel in a vertical escapement, found only in very early clocks
9. (Law) English legal history
a. the area encompassing the royal court that is subject to the jurisdiction of the Lord High Steward
b. a rod or wand carried as a symbol of office or emblem of authority, as in the Church. Also (obsolete): virge
c. a rod held by a person swearing fealty to his lord on becoming a tenant, esp of copyhold land
vb
10. (foll by: on) to be near (to): to verge on chaos.
11. (when: intr, sometimes foll by on) to serve as the edge of (something): this narrow strip verges the road.
[C15: from Old French, from Latin virga rod]

verge

(vɜːdʒ)
vb
(intr; foll by to or towards) to move or incline in a certain direction
[C17: from Latin vergere]

verge1

(vɜrdʒ)

n., v. verged, verg•ing. n.
1. the limit beyond which something begins or occurs; brink: on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
2. the edge or margin of something: the verge of a desert.
3. a limiting belt, strip, or border of something.
4. a strip of turf bordering a walk or roadway.
5. the part of a sloping roof that projects beyond the gable wall.
6. a staff, esp. one carried as an emblem of authority or symbol of office of a bishop, dean, etc.
7. a palletlike lever formerly used in inexpensive pendulum clocks.
8. a wand held in the hand of a feudal tenant while swearing fealty to a lord.
v.i.
9. to be on the verge or margin; border: Our property verges on theirs.
10. to come close to or approach some state, quality, etc.: a scientific mind verging on genius.
[1350–1400; shaft, column, rod (hence jurisdiction symbolized by a steward's rod), Middle English: penis < Middle French: rod < Latin virga]

verge2

(vɜrdʒ)

v.i. verged, verg•ing.
1. to incline; tend (usu. fol. by to or toward): The economy verges toward inflation.
2. to slope or sink.
[1600–10; < Latin vergere to turn, bend, be inclined]

verge


Past participle: verged
Gerund: verging

Imperative
verge
verge
Present
I verge
you verge
he/she/it verges
we verge
you verge
they verge
Preterite
I verged
you verged
he/she/it verged
we verged
you verged
they verged
Present Continuous
I am verging
you are verging
he/she/it is verging
we are verging
you are verging
they are verging
Present Perfect
I have verged
you have verged
he/she/it has verged
we have verged
you have verged
they have verged
Past Continuous
I was verging
you were verging
he/she/it was verging
we were verging
you were verging
they were verging
Past Perfect
I had verged
you had verged
he/she/it had verged
we had verged
you had verged
they had verged
Future
I will verge
you will verge
he/she/it will verge
we will verge
you will verge
they will verge
Future Perfect
I will have verged
you will have verged
he/she/it will have verged
we will have verged
you will have verged
they will have verged
Future Continuous
I will be verging
you will be verging
he/she/it will be verging
we will be verging
you will be verging
they will be verging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been verging
you have been verging
he/she/it has been verging
we have been verging
you have been verging
they have been verging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been verging
you will have been verging
he/she/it will have been verging
we will have been verging
you will have been verging
they will have been verging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been verging
you had been verging
he/she/it had been verging
we had been verging
you had been verging
they had been verging
Conditional
I would verge
you would verge
he/she/it would verge
we would verge
you would verge
they would verge
Past Conditional
I would have verged
you would have verged
he/she/it would have verged
we would have verged
you would have verged
they would have verged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verge - a region marking a boundaryverge - a region marking a boundary    
bound, boundary, edge - a line determining the limits of an area
2.verge - the limit beyond which something happens or changes; "on the verge of tears"; "on the brink of bankruptcy"
limit, bound, boundary - the greatest possible degree of something; "what he did was beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior"; "to the limit of his ability"
3.verge - a ceremonial or emblematic staffverge - a ceremonial or emblematic staff  
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
bauble - a mock scepter carried by a court jester
4.verge - a grass border along a road
border - a strip forming the outer edge of something; "the rug had a wide blue border"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.verge - border on; come close to; "His behavior verges on the criminal"
border, bound - form the boundary of; be contiguous to

verge

noun
1. brink, point, edge, threshold Carole was on the verge of tears.
2. border, edge, margin, limit, extreme, lip, boundary, threshold, roadside, brim The car pulled over on to the verge off the road.
verge on something come near to, approach, border on, resemble, incline to, be similar to, touch on, be more or less, be tantamount to, tend towards, be not far from, incline towards a fury that verges on madness

verge

noun
1. A fairly narrow line or space forming a boundary:
Chiefly Military: perimeter.
2. A transitional interval beyond which some new action or different state of affairs is likely to begin or occur:
verb
1. To be contiguous or next to:
2. To put or form a border on:
phrasal verb
verge on
To come near, as in quality or amount:
Translations
حافَّهيُتاخِم، يكون على الحافَّه
okrajpokrajbýt na pokraji
=-kantkant
parrasrajareuna
jaîra viîkantur; vegarbrún
būti ant ribos
apmalebūt uz robežasrobežoties ar
byť na pokraji
kenarsınırda olmakyaklaşmak

verge

[vɜːdʒ] N
1. [of road] → borde m; [of motorway] → arcén m
2. (fig) → borde m, margen m
to be on the verge of disaster/a nervous breakdownestar al borde de la catástrofe/de una crisis nerviosa
we are on the verge of warestamos al borde de la guerra
to be on the verge of a great discoveryestar en la antesala de un gran descubrimiento
she was on the verge of tearsestaba a punto de llorar
to be on the verge of doing sthestar a punto or al borde de hacer algo
verge on verge upon VI + PREPrayar en; [colour] → tirar a
a state verging on madnessun estado que raya en la locura

verge

[ˈvɜːrdʒ]
n
(mainly British) [road] → accotement m
"soft verges" → "accotements non stabilisés"
(= brink) to be on the verge of doing sth → être sur le point de faire qch
to be on the verge of sth → être au bord de qch
on the verge of tears → au bord des larmes
on the verge of collapse → au bord de l'effondrement
on the verge of death → à l'article de la mort
on the verge of bankruptcy → au bord de la banqueroute
verge on
vt fustendre vers

verge

n
(Brit lit) → Rand m; “keep off the verge„Bankette or Seitenstreifen nicht befahrbar
(fig) to be on the verge of ruin/waram Rande des Ruins/eines Krieges stehen; to be on the verge of a nervous breakdownam Rande eines Nervenzusammenbruchs sein; to be on the verge of a discoverykurz vor einer Entdeckung stehen; to be on the verge of tearsden Tränen nahe sein; to be on the verge of doing somethingim Begriff sein, etw zu tun; I was on the verge of giving away the secret (accidentally) → ich hätte das Geheimnis um ein Haar ausgeplaudert

verge

[vɜːdʒ] n (of road) → bordo, margine m (fig) → orlo
"soft verges" (Brit) → "banchina cedevole"
to be on the verge of (disaster) → essere sull'orlo di (a discovery) → essere alle soglie di
she was on the verge of tears → stava quasi per piangere
to be on the verge of doing sth → essere sul punto di fare qc
verge on vi + preprasentare

verge

(vəːdʒ) noun
the (grass) edging of a garden bed, a road etc. It's illegal to drive on the grass verge.
verb
to be on the border (of). She is verging on insanity.

verge

n. anillo anal; margen; límite; borde;
on the ___ ofa punto de.
References in classic literature ?
She turned scarlet and was on the verge of crying, when she met Laurie's eyes, which would look merry in spite of his heroic efforts.
Every successive struggle brought them nearer to the verge, where Duncan perceived the final and conquering effort must be made.
At last, after creeping, as it were, for such a length of time along the utmost verge of the opaque puddle of obscurity, they had taken that downright plunge which, sooner or later, is the destiny of all families, whether princely or plebeian.
On some such morning, when three or four vessels happen to have arrived at once usually from Africa or South America -- or to be on the verge of their departure thitherward, there is a sound of frequent feet passing briskly up and down the granite steps.
Here was a population, low-class and mostly foreign, hanging always on the verge of starvation, and dependent for its opportunities of life upon the whim of men every bit as brutal and unscrupulous as the old-time slave drivers; under such circumstances immorality was exactly as inevitable, and as prevalent, as it was under the system of chattel slavery.
On they came, and in a moment the burly form of Tom appeared in sight, almost at the verge of the chasm.
we found the aforetime young matron graying toward the imminent verge of her half century, and the babies all men and women, and some of them married and experimenting familywise themselves -- for not a soul of the tribe was dead
It is only two or three thousand feet high, and of course has no snow upon it in summer, whereas the Jungfrau is not much shorter of fourteen thousand feet high and therefore that lowest verge of snow on her side, which seems nearly down to the valley level, is really about seven thousand feet higher up in the air than the summit of that wooded rampart.
Pudd'nhead Wilson had a trifle of money when he arrived, and he bought a small house on the extreme western verge of the town.
Then at once they reached and hovered upon the imminent verge of sleep -- but an intruder came, now, that would not "down.
Perhaps because of his very weakness Rebecca's decision of character had a fascination for him, and although she snubbed him to the verge of madness, he could never keep his eyes away from her.
Have I not described a pleasant site for a dwelling, when I speak of it as bosomed in hill and wood, and rising from the verge of a stream?