verge

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Related to verged: took over

verge 1

 (vûrj)
n.
1.
a. An edge or margin; a border. See Synonyms at border.
b. Architecture The edge of the tiling that projects over a roof gable.
c. Chiefly British A grassy border, as along a road.
2. The point beyond which an action, state, or condition is likely to begin or occur; the brink: on the verge of tears; a nation on the verge of economic prosperity.
3. A rod, wand, or staff carried as an emblem of authority or office.
4. The spindle of a balance wheel in a clock or watch, especially such a spindle in a clock with vertical escapement.
5. The male organ of copulation in certain mollusks.
intr.v. verged, verg·ing, verg·es
1. To approach the nature or condition of something specified; come close. Used with on: a brilliance verging on genius.
2. To be on the edge or border: Her land verges on the neighboring township.

[Middle English, from Old French, rod, ring, from Latin virga, rod, strip.]

verge 2

 (vûrj)
intr.v. verged, verg·ing, verg·es
1. To slope or incline.
2. To tend to move in a particular direction: "the Neoclassicism ... away from which they subsequently verged" (Hugh Honour).
3. To pass or merge gradually: dusk verging into night.

[Latin vergere; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

verge

(vɜːdʒ)
n
1. an edge or rim; margin
2. a limit beyond which something occurs; brink: on the verge of ecstasy.
3. Brit a grass border along a road
4. an enclosing line, belt, or strip
5. (Architecture) architect the edge of the roof tiles projecting over a gable
6. (Architecture) architect the shaft of a classical column
7. an enclosed space
8. (Horology) horology the spindle of a balance wheel in a vertical escapement, found only in very early clocks
9. (Law) English legal history
a. the area encompassing the royal court that is subject to the jurisdiction of the Lord High Steward
b. a rod or wand carried as a symbol of office or emblem of authority, as in the Church. Also (obsolete): virge
c. a rod held by a person swearing fealty to his lord on becoming a tenant, esp of copyhold land
vb
10. (foll by: on) to be near (to): to verge on chaos.
11. (when: intr, sometimes foll by on) to serve as the edge of (something): this narrow strip verges the road.
[C15: from Old French, from Latin virga rod]

verge

(vɜːdʒ)
vb
(intr; foll by to or towards) to move or incline in a certain direction
[C17: from Latin vergere]

verge1

(vɜrdʒ)

n., v. verged, verg•ing. n.
1. the limit beyond which something begins or occurs; brink: on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
2. the edge or margin of something: the verge of a desert.
3. a limiting belt, strip, or border of something.
4. a strip of turf bordering a walk or roadway.
5. the part of a sloping roof that projects beyond the gable wall.
6. a staff, esp. one carried as an emblem of authority or symbol of office of a bishop, dean, etc.
7. a palletlike lever formerly used in inexpensive pendulum clocks.
8. a wand held in the hand of a feudal tenant while swearing fealty to a lord.
v.i.
9. to be on the verge or margin; border: Our property verges on theirs.
10. to come close to or approach some state, quality, etc.: a scientific mind verging on genius.
[1350–1400; shaft, column, rod (hence jurisdiction symbolized by a steward's rod), Middle English: penis < Middle French: rod < Latin virga]

verge2

(vɜrdʒ)

v.i. verged, verg•ing.
1. to incline; tend (usu. fol. by to or toward): The economy verges toward inflation.
2. to slope or sink.
[1600–10; < Latin vergere to turn, bend, be inclined]

verge


Past participle: verged
Gerund: verging

Imperative
verge
verge
Present
I verge
you verge
he/she/it verges
we verge
you verge
they verge
Preterite
I verged
you verged
he/she/it verged
we verged
you verged
they verged
Present Continuous
I am verging
you are verging
he/she/it is verging
we are verging
you are verging
they are verging
Present Perfect
I have verged
you have verged
he/she/it has verged
we have verged
you have verged
they have verged
Past Continuous
I was verging
you were verging
he/she/it was verging
we were verging
you were verging
they were verging
Past Perfect
I had verged
you had verged
he/she/it had verged
we had verged
you had verged
they had verged
Future
I will verge
you will verge
he/she/it will verge
we will verge
you will verge
they will verge
Future Perfect
I will have verged
you will have verged
he/she/it will have verged
we will have verged
you will have verged
they will have verged
Future Continuous
I will be verging
you will be verging
he/she/it will be verging
we will be verging
you will be verging
they will be verging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been verging
you have been verging
he/she/it has been verging
we have been verging
you have been verging
they have been verging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been verging
you will have been verging
he/she/it will have been verging
we will have been verging
you will have been verging
they will have been verging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been verging
you had been verging
he/she/it had been verging
we had been verging
you had been verging
they had been verging
Conditional
I would verge
you would verge
he/she/it would verge
we would verge
you would verge
they would verge
Past Conditional
I would have verged
you would have verged
he/she/it would have verged
we would have verged
you would have verged
they would have verged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verge - a region marking a boundaryverge - a region marking a boundary    
bound, boundary, edge - a line determining the limits of an area
2.verge - the limit beyond which something happens or changes; "on the verge of tears"; "on the brink of bankruptcy"
limit, bound, boundary - the greatest possible degree of something; "what he did was beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior"; "to the limit of his ability"
3.verge - a ceremonial or emblematic staffverge - a ceremonial or emblematic staff  
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
bauble - a mock scepter carried by a court jester
4.verge - a grass border along a road
border - a strip forming the outer edge of something; "the rug had a wide blue border"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.verge - border on; come close to; "His behavior verges on the criminal"
border, bound - form the boundary of; be contiguous to

verge

noun
1. brink, point, edge, threshold Carole was on the verge of tears.
2. border, edge, margin, limit, extreme, lip, boundary, threshold, roadside, brim The car pulled over on to the verge off the road.
verge on something come near to, approach, border on, resemble, incline to, be similar to, touch on, be more or less, be tantamount to, tend towards, be not far from, incline towards a fury that verges on madness

verge

noun
1. A fairly narrow line or space forming a boundary:
Chiefly Military: perimeter.
2. A transitional interval beyond which some new action or different state of affairs is likely to begin or occur:
verb
1. To be contiguous or next to:
2. To put or form a border on:
phrasal verb
verge on
To come near, as in quality or amount:
Translations
حافَّهيُتاخِم، يكون على الحافَّه
okrajpokrajbýt na pokraji
=-kantkant
parrasrajareuna
jaîra viîkantur; vegarbrún
būti ant ribos
apmalebūt uz robežasrobežoties ar
byť na pokraji
kenarsınırda olmakyaklaşmak

verge

[vɜːdʒ] N
1. [of road] → borde m; [of motorway] → arcén m
2. (fig) → borde m, margen m
to be on the verge of disaster/a nervous breakdownestar al borde de la catástrofe/de una crisis nerviosa
we are on the verge of warestamos al borde de la guerra
to be on the verge of a great discoveryestar en la antesala de un gran descubrimiento
she was on the verge of tearsestaba a punto de llorar
to be on the verge of doing sthestar a punto or al borde de hacer algo
verge on verge upon VI + PREPrayar en; [colour] → tirar a
a state verging on madnessun estado que raya en la locura

verge

[ˈvɜːrdʒ]
n
(mainly British) [road] → accotement m
"soft verges" → "accotements non stabilisés"
(= brink) to be on the verge of doing sth → être sur le point de faire qch
to be on the verge of sth → être au bord de qch
on the verge of tears → au bord des larmes
on the verge of collapse → au bord de l'effondrement
on the verge of death → à l'article de la mort
on the verge of bankruptcy → au bord de la banqueroute
verge on
vt fustendre vers

verge

n
(Brit lit) → Rand m; “keep off the verge„Bankette or Seitenstreifen nicht befahrbar
(fig) to be on the verge of ruin/waram Rande des Ruins/eines Krieges stehen; to be on the verge of a nervous breakdownam Rande eines Nervenzusammenbruchs sein; to be on the verge of a discoverykurz vor einer Entdeckung stehen; to be on the verge of tearsden Tränen nahe sein; to be on the verge of doing somethingim Begriff sein, etw zu tun; I was on the verge of giving away the secret (accidentally) → ich hätte das Geheimnis um ein Haar ausgeplaudert

verge

[vɜːdʒ] n (of road) → bordo, margine m (fig) → orlo
"soft verges" (Brit) → "banchina cedevole"
to be on the verge of (disaster) → essere sull'orlo di (a discovery) → essere alle soglie di
she was on the verge of tears → stava quasi per piangere
to be on the verge of doing sth → essere sul punto di fare qc
verge on vi + preprasentare

verge

(vəːdʒ) noun
the (grass) edging of a garden bed, a road etc. It's illegal to drive on the grass verge.
verb
to be on the border (of). She is verging on insanity.

verge

n. anillo anal; margen; límite; borde;
on the ___ ofa punto de.
References in classic literature ?
A painting in the dining-hall verged upon the indelicate-- but then the Margravine was herself a trifle indelicate.
The year had done much for the boy--turning his already mighty muscles to thews of steel, developing his woodcraft to a point where it verged upon the uncanny, perfecting his arboreal instincts, and training him in the use of both natural and artificial weapons.
It is clear to me now that, owing to my unbounded vanity and to the high standard I set for myself, I often looked at myself with furious discontent, which verged on loathing, and so I inwardly attributed the same feeling to everyone.