verifiability


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Related to verifiability: Faithful representation

verifiability

(ˌvɛrɪfaɪəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the quality or state of being capable of being verified, confirmed, or substantiated
Translations

verifiability

[ˌverɪfaɪəˈbɪlɪtɪ] Nverificabilidad f

verifiability

nNachweisbarkeit f, → Nachprüfbarkeit f, → Verifizierbarkeit f (geh)
References in classic literature ?
Many difficult problems arise as regards the verifiability of beliefs.
Importantly, the contracting environment is described by bargaining powers, whether negotiation is recurrent, and the extent of verifiability.
Possible candidates are generality, realism, verifiability, empirical corroboration, and last but not least, testability.
Silver mischievously adds that "If you want to annoy a logical positivist, ask him if the verifiability principle stands up to its own criteria for verifiability.
Relying on secondary sources for how directors conduct themselves is not an acceptable substitute because of the lack of verifiability Nor are board minutes of much help.
Finally, neither of the two quotes that have some degree of verifiability mention the Ten Commandments.
Chapter 2 focuses on the logical positivists and their famous (or infamous) verifiability principle.
Despairing of developing an adequate phenomenalistic account of the external world, Misak's sympathies are with the left wing of the Vienna circle - Neurath and others whose holism and realism renders them allies of the pragmatist approach to verifiability.
Indeed, just as the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels emphasizes at every point the need for textual verifiability, Legitimate Histories repeatedly dismisses as less than adequate any reading of Scott which Dr Robertson finds to be insufficiently aware of what she argues is the centrality of the Gothic.
the media brief warned that "a signal will be sent to prospective libel plaintiffs everywhere: sue in England in order to circumvent the constitutional requirements that you prove verifiability, falsity and fault, recover a judgment on strict liability theory, and then come to the United States to enforce a judgment that you could never have obtained here.
The problem is that this technique sacrifices verifiability for verisimilitude, and substitutes color for hard-headed analysis.
In general, we are initially inclined to agree with Professor King, although, like Professor Herrnson, we wish he would call this issue verifiability rather than replication.