verlan


Also found in: Wikipedia.

verlan

(French vɛrlɑ̃)
n
(Languages) a variety of French slang in which the syllables are inverted, such as meuf for femme, and also incorporating Arabic words and phrases
[C20: from inverting the syllables of the French word l'envers meaning the other way round]
References in periodicals archive ?
She was the daughter of the late Verlan and Anna (Chandler) Geiser.
L'origine de ce mot pourrait etre du verlan et sigpifierait <<chez nous>>, facon de suggerer qu'il s'agit d'un parler local a forte charge identitaire.
Franco-Maghrebi and French rappers in general also incorporate verlan into their lyrics in part to make their listeners laugh.
Given the marginal status of these communities vis-a-vis elite Parisian culture, Verlan can be viewed as an alternative code which stands both literally and figuratively outside the hegemonic norms of Parisian culture and language' (p.
During this decade, the association formed Verlan Limited, an insurance company that provided general/product liability insurance and property coverage.
For example, MC Solaar, a rapper originally from Senegal, mixes his home country's rhetorical griot tradition with French verlan (the inverting of French phonemes; for example "police" becomes "licepo," hence, verlan, l'envers, to invert), with the French pop music tradition of puns, plays on words, and suggestive phonetic combinations, and with African American traditions of competitive signifying (ibid.
Ervil LeBaron of Chihuahua, Mexico, was convicted of murdering his own brother, Verlan LeBaron, and many other members of the Firstborn order.
Both write short, poetic sentences with a melange of French, colloquial Arabic, verlan, and bits of other languages.
Trude - Verlan Dean Trude, 71, of Springfield, died March 13.
It derives from the reversal of syllables in the word arabe (even though not all North Africans are Arabs; some are Berbers), following the use of verlan, or backslang, in the outer suburbs of Paris.
57) Beur is a verlan term, a slang that reverses the syllables of words; thus "arabe" here has become "beur.