vernacularism


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ver·nac·u·lar·ism

 (vər-năk′yə-lə-rĭz′əm)
n.
A vernacular word or expression.

vernacularism

(vəˈnækjʊləˌrɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) the use of the vernacular or a term in the vernacular

vernacularism

1. a word, phrase, or idiom from the native and popular language, contrasted with literary or learned language.
2. the use of the vernacular. — vernacular, n., adj.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned earlier, postcolonial writers infuse their works with their local cultures and traditions: oral culture, vernacularism, local folklore, mythology, and history.
Sobecki challenges the traditional view that the crystallisation of England's vernacular legal culture occurred during the period 1550 to 1600 as part of a movement towards vernacularism that occurred in the wake of the Reformation.
Still, Cervantes was a permanent defender of vernacularism.
Although the idealistic goals of the republic of letters remained, by 1630 publication had become an end in itself an end insufficient to sustain the blows usually seen as the cause of the decline of learned publications--which, besides the Thirty Years' War, included strident confessionalism, the re-Catholicization of some printing centres, and the rise of vernacularism.