vernacularism


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ver·nac·u·lar·ism

 (vər-năk′yə-lə-rĭz′əm)
n.
A vernacular word or expression.

vernacularism

(vəˈnækjʊləˌrɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) the use of the vernacular or a term in the vernacular

vernacularism

1. a word, phrase, or idiom from the native and popular language, contrasted with literary or learned language.
2. the use of the vernacular. — vernacular, n., adj.
See also: Language
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the idealistic goals of the republic of letters remained, by 1630 publication had become an end in itself an end insufficient to sustain the blows usually seen as the cause of the decline of learned publications--which, besides the Thirty Years' War, included strident confessionalism, the re-Catholicization of some printing centres, and the rise of vernacularism.
As with MacDiarmid, Hart detects a regional cosmopolitanism at work in Bunting's writing, a quality he connects to synthetic vernacularism.
The book's five main chapters unpack this "exclusionary logic," noting its importance for understanding the ideological dimensions of Renaissance humanism, theology, vernacularism, nationalism, law, print culture, and theories of emotion.