vernacular

(redirected from vernaculars)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to vernaculars: vernacularly

ver·nac·u·lar

 (vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

[From Latin vernāculus, native, from verna, native slave, perhaps of Etruscan origin.]

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.

vernacular

(vəˈnækjʊlə)
n
1. (Linguistics) the vernacular the commonly spoken language or dialect of a particular people or place
2. (Architecture) a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built: this architect has re-created a true English vernacular.
adj
3. relating to, using, or in the vernacular
4. (Biology) designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
5. (Architecture) built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style
[C17: from Latin vernāculus belonging to a household slave, from verna household slave]
verˈnacularly adv

ver•nac•u•lar

(vərˈnæk yə lər, vəˈnæk-)

adj.
1. (of language) native or indigenous (opposed to literary or learned).
2. expressed or written in the native language of a place.
3. of, pertaining to, or using such a language.
4. using plain, everyday language.
5. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of architectural vernacular.
6. of or pertaining to the common name for a plant, animal, or other organism.
n.
7. the native speech or language of a place.
8. the distinctive vocabulary of a class or profession.
9. the plain variety of language in everyday use by ordinary people.
10. the common name of a plant, animal, or other organism as distinguished from its Latin scientific name.
11. a style of architecture exemplifying the commonest techniques, decorative features, and materials of a particular historical period, region, or group of people.
[1595–1605; < Latin vernācul(us) household, domestic, native]
ver•nac′u•lar•ly, adv.
syn: See language.

vernacular

Used to describe the everyday language used by ordinary people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vernacular - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
blowjob, cock sucking - slang for fellatio
hand job, jacking off, jerking off, wank - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
arsehole, bunghole, arse, asshole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
poor white trash, white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
honkey, honkie, honky, whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye, gook - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
hymie, kike, sheeny, yid - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
Chinaman, chink - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Chinese descent
dago, ginzo, greaseball, wop, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spick, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
2.vernacular - the everyday speech of the people (as distinguished from literary language)
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
Adj.1.vernacular - being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language; "common parlance"; "a vernacular term"; "vernacular speakers"; "the vulgar tongue of the masses"; "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species"
informal - used of spoken and written language

vernacular

noun
1. speech, jargon, idiom, parlance, cant, native language, dialect, patois, argot, vulgar tongue To use the vernacular of the day, Peter was square.
adjective
1. colloquial, popular, informal, local, common, native, indigenous, vulgar dialects such as black vernacular English

vernacular

noun
1. A system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture:
Linguistics: langue.
2. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations
لُغَة دارِجَهلُغَة عامِيَّه ، لُغَة مَحْكِيَّه
hovorovýnářečí
dagligdags sprogdialekt
nemzeti nyelvnépnyelvi
òjóîtunga; mál alòÿîunnar
vietinė kalba
dzimtaismātes-vietējā valoda/dialektsvietējais
halk dilihalk dilindeyerli lehçeyerli lehçede

vernacular

[vəˈnækjʊləʳ]
A. ADJ
1. (Ling) → vernáculo, vulgar
in vernacular Persianen persa vulgar, en la lengua vernácula de Persia
2. [architecture] → típico, local, regional
B. N (Ling) → lengua f vernácula (fig) → lenguaje m corriente, lenguaje m vulgar

vernacular

[vərˈnækjʊr] n (= dialect) → dialecte m

vernacular

n
(= dialect)Mundart f; (= not Latin, not official language)Landessprache f; this word has now come into the vernaculardieses Wort ist jetzt in die Alltagssprache eingegangen
(= jargon)Fachsprache for -jargon m
(hum: = strong language) → deftige Sprache; please excuse the vernacularentschuldigen Sie bitte, dass ich mich so drastisch ausdrücke
(Archit) → traditioneller Baustil
adj
vernacular newspaperZeitung fin der regionalen Landessprache; vernacular languagemundartliche Sprache; vernacular poetMundartdichter(in) m(f)
(Archit) → traditionell
(= indigenous) styletraditionell; crafts, furnitureeinheimisch

vernacular

[vəˈnækjʊləʳ]
1. nvernacolo
2. adjvernacolare

vernacular

(vəˈnӕkjulə) adjective
colloquial or informally conversational. vernacular speech/language.
noun
the common informal language of a country etc as opposed to its formal or literary language. They spoke to each other in the vernacular of the region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glossing the Psalms: The Emergence of the Written Vernaculars in Western Europe From the Seventh to the Twelfth Centuries
Royal Media Services (RMS) will be introducing four vernaculars TV services in Kenya under the company s strategy to consolidate and diversify its business.
46) Dante identifies at least fourteen principal Italian vernaculars and suggests that in all their variations must exceed a thousand.
Though it might seem obvious that the early modern vernaculars would be in some sense alienated from classical ideals of fine speaking, in reading this book we quickly learn that this eccentric--that is, de-centered, deviant--eloquence is not a vernacular innovation.
This comprehensive bibliography offers convenient access to the vast amount of material that has been published in the last 50 years on the intersection of language and education with regard to African American Vernacular English, English-based pidgins and creoles, Latina/o English, Native American English, and other vernaculars such as Appalachian English in the US and Aboriginal English in Australia.
While she pays close attention to the particularities of the diverse literary traditions she is studying and the historical contexts in which these arose, she also stresses how it was the adoption of Islam and the impact of the Arabic cosmopolis that in turn transformed literary production in the local vernaculars.
I do not mean to suggest that the adoption of the alphabet and of West Semitic vernaculars in the Iron Age Levant were not significant literary developments.
Vernaculars can now be manufactured as much as discovered.
Vatican City -- The translation of 'pro multis' as 'for all' by the International Commission on English in the Liturgy after the Second Vatican Council, has generated more controversy than any other single translation in the various vernaculars of the Mass.
His architecture also exhibits the influence of the Mediterranean vernaculars that inspired modern architects and are so apt for the Cape's climate and landscape.
Specific comparisons concretely confirm that Della Porta inhabited two linguistically separate worlds, one theoretical and philosophical, compact of Latin and erudite coinages, the other a milieu of laboratory and crafts generating idiomatic terms in different vernaculars.
Translations of Latin texts into the two vernaculars used in medieval England (Middle English and Middle French) entailed complicated negotiations and exchanges among various groups: clerical and lay; clerical and monastic; monastic and semi-monastic; men and women; literate and illiterate, both in the medieval sense of not knowing Latin and in the modern sense of not having learned to read.